Business Monday: Popular midvalley eatery The Biscuit ready for trial run in Aspen | AspenTimes.com

Business Monday: Popular midvalley eatery The Biscuit ready for trial run in Aspen

Drew Scott prepares a dish at The Biscuit, a food truck in El Jebel, on Friday morning. The breakfast eatery resolves around, you guessed, their homemade biscuits. They will make a trial run in Aspen this winter.
Scott Condon/The Aspen Times

Aspen can have its biscuits and eat them, too.

The Biscuit food truck that’s been a hit in the Movieland parking lot in El Jebel-Basalt for the past four months is taking its concept on the road. It will hold a trial in Aspen, sans the truck.

Owner Matthew Campbell said a customer made introductions that led to The Biscuit getting recruited to supply food during the second annual Aspen Winter Market, which is held on weekends in a heated tent on the patio of the Grey Lady restaurant in Aspen.

Campbell spoke to the owners of the Grey Lady and made arrangements to use the kitchen during the morning and early afternoon, before the restaurant starts preparing dinners.

The Biscuit will make its Aspen debut from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Grey Lady, 305 S. Mill St.

“We’re kind of doing it as an impromptu pop-up, if you will,” Campbell said. “If it goes well, we’ll do it every weekend through March.”

The Biscuit has honed its menu since opening its food truck in El Jebel in August. Fried chicken was added by popular demand.

“People like fried-chicken biscuits,” said Drew Scott, a veteran restaurateur who Campbell recruited to launch the business.

“We’ve been doing trial and error. If (a new menu item) sells, we keep it. If not, we take it off,” Scott said.

The menu will be condensed in Aspen, but it will include favorites such as Son of a Biscuit, a sandwich that features fried chicken, bacon and avocado, and Little Happenin’, which features fried chicken sauce gravy on a biscuit.

The food truck is open weekday mornings along East Valley Road. It attracts a mix of construction workers and office workers. The only surprise, Campbell said, is there’s usually a surge with people going to work at 8 a.m. They figured they might have an earlier crowd.

The Biscuit erects a heated tent outside of its truck for patrons to take the sting out of waiting in the cold morning chill. Scott said he aims to serve the breakfasts within five minutes so nobody waits too long.

Large orders for offices or gatherings are becoming popular. Campbell said they typically get an order for 15 or more. The truck also gets recruited to provide food during special events.

Campbell said The Biscuit’s direction is largely in the hands of Aspen residents and visitors. If the weekend morning gig at the Grey Lady proves popular, they will go that direction throughout the winter, and then explore upper-valley options after the Aspen Winter Market ends.

If the Aspen trial flops or is mediocre, they will continue looking for special events on weekends.

scondon@aspentimes.com


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