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On Our Minds

On September 14, Renew Roaring Fork Assisted Living and Memory Care presents a trio of experts to discuss research, care and living with Alzheimer’s and dementia-related illnesses (Getty Images)
On September 14, Renew Roaring Fork Assisted Living and Memory Care presents a trio of experts to discuss research, care and living with Alzheimer’s and dementia-related illnesses (Getty Images)

Annabel Bowlen didn’t know much about Alzheimer’s Disease until 2012, when she had an encounter with her father Pat Bowlen, former owner and CEO of the Denver Broncos. “I was a student at CU Boulder and went home to study for finals. I thought my dad would be excited to see me. Instead, he was confused and upset I was there. This was very uncharacteristic for him, and I didn’t understand what was going on until my mother pulled me aside and told me.”

After graduation, Annabel dedicated herself to the care of her father, who died of Alzheimer’s related illness in 2019. Today she is now caring for her mother, also named Annabel, who, in a cruel, but increasingly more common twist of fate, was diagnosed with the same disease just a year before the death of her husband.

On Tuesday, Sept. 14, from 5-7 p.m. Annabel Bowlen, known as “Little Bell,” to her family and friends, will discuss what life is like as a caregiver to loved ones navigating this disease, and how caregivers can prevent burnout, in an upcoming Health Series talk at the Renew Roaring Fork Assisted Living and Memory Care center in Glenwood Springs.

The two-hour event, according to Lee Tuchfarber, CEO of Renew Senior Communities, is intended to give guests (both in-person and via webcast) new information in the research of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia-related illnesses.

“So many people are feeling helpless because there are no meaningful pharmaceuticals that exist to treat Alzheimer’s,” notes Tuchfarber. “This discussion will highlight some of the new areas of research that are non-traditional and very promising. It will leave people with hope.”

Joining Bowen in the talk are two representatives from the Knoebel Institute for Heathy Aging at the University of Denver, executive director Dr. Lotta Granholm-Bentley and Dr. Eric Chess, founder and director of the Paul Freeman Financial Security Program at DU.

Dr. Granholm-Bentley has been working with Alzheimer’s disease for 30 years, focusing on new methods of early detection.

“What we look at is not just developing new medication, but how lifestyle changes can be effective in preventing or slowing down the progression of Alzheimer’s,” she says. These include moderate exercise, stress reduction and a “Blue Zones” diet focused on Mediterranean nutrition. “These lifestyle changes are able to cut down the risk of Alzheimer’s by at least 50 percent,” she says. “Eating salmon three times a week increases lifespan by five years.”

One of the key advantages of the work being done at the Knoebel Institute is the cross-disciplinary studies that University of Denver provides. From social work, to business, to psychology, the study of Alzheimer’s disease and its eventual cure, Dr. Granholm-Bentley believes, will depend on several disciplines working together, in addition to healthcare, to find a way forward. Speaking to this component of Alzheimer’s research at the Glenwood event is Dr. Eric Chess, who’s research focuses on a specific, and surprising, early indicator of cognitive decline – financial decision making.

“The earliest cognitive indicator — impaired financial decision making – is often shown decades before any other symptoms,” says Dr. Chess. “Often it’s not the doctors, but certified financial planners, banks and credit card companies that see these decisions that don’t make sense. It’s here we see the earliest signs because financial decision making encompasses a wide array of cognitive tasks — risk assessment, personal implications, decision making, It’s a lot more than the math. You are using a lot of different parts of your brain, simultaneously.”

JOIN RENEW AND ANNABEL BOWLEN, ON SEPTEMBER 14

What: “Promising New Alzheimer’s Research”

When: September 14, 5-7 p.m.

Where: Renew Roaring Fork, Assisted Living and Memory Care, 2800 Midland Ave., Glenwood Springs

Speakers: Lotta Granholm-Bentley, Ph.D, Eric Chess, MD, JD and Annabel Bowlen

For in-person attendance registration, call (720) 679-5528. Event will be held outdoors. Proof of vaccination must be shown at the door. For webinar registration, visit www.renewsenior.com

New advances in cervical artificial disc replacement can lead to revolutionary improvements in motion and mobility

After his neck pain became unmanageable with basic treatment, Teddy Errico explored surgical options and learned about cervical artificial disc replacement with Dr. Ernest Braxton. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)
After his neck pain became unmanageable with basic treatment, Teddy Errico explored surgical options and learned about cervical artificial disc replacement with Dr. Ernest Braxton. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)

The active lifestyle of folks in the High Country certainly produces its share of neck and spinal injuries and lots of accelerated wear and tear. But the good news is that a local specialist can offer an up-to-date, truly world-class solution for many patients, allowing them to return to their busy lives with less pain and without a neck fusion.

Dr. Ernest Braxton, a noted neurosurgeon with offices at Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery in both Eagle and Summit counties, is a leading expert at treatments involving cervical artificial disc replacements. Unlike the old days, where disc fusion surgeries were often the primary solution to disc damage, Braxton said that the newest generation of artificial disc implants can lead to much faster recovery times and marked improvement in both mobility and reduction of pain and discomfort.

“We provide a service for motion preservation, and a big alternative to fusion,” Braxton said. “Disc replacement maintains motion, and reduces and prevents adjacent segment disease. And we’ve had a 90% satisfaction rate –revision surgeries are less common on a disc replacement procedure.”

Dr. Ernest Braxton, a noted neurosurgeon with offices at Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery in both Eagle and Summit counties, is a leading expert at treatments involving cervical artificial disc replacements. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)
Dr. Ernest Braxton, a noted neurosurgeon with offices at Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery in both Eagle and Summit counties, is a leading expert at treatments involving cervical artificial disc replacements. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)VSO Dr Braxton 2 DT 8-27-19 Dominique Taylor/Dominique Taylor Photography

All of that, right here at the Vail Valley Surgery Center, in an outpatient setting that often allows patients to be back to their active lives.

Some real-life experience with artificial disc replacement
Like many Colorado residents, 53-year-old Telluride Realtor Teddy Errico has always played a little too hard – whether that be skiing, hockey, golf, softball or surfing.

“I had a little too much fun over all the years, especially all those fun things we do on the mountain,” Errico said.

Fifteen years ago, trouble began with a herniated C4-5 disc in his neck. Errico said he initially managed with PT visits and a stretching regimen. But by 2019, he had developed severe neck and arm pain that would go away with conservative care.

“I thought I could just grind through the pain, as you do in mountain life, but after getting some relief from a chiropractor visit, it never got better, and my doctor suggested I might need surgery,” he explained. 

COVID-19 complicated Errico’s options, but after talking to a half dozen specialists across the state, Errico got in touch with Braxton and said he was immediately impressed by his approach, and his suggestion of cervical artificial disc replacement.

Errico added “I knew his resume and I was impressed by how unbelievably well you get treated by his staff,”

Braxton said the technology involved in artificial disc replacement has been in existence in the United States since 2007, but the device he now uses was approved by the FDA in April 2021 for two levels. Made of PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) and ceramic, the discs are an artificial ceramic and biopolymer mix that makes them more compatible with MRI scans.

Braxton said cervical artificial disc replacement is not for everyone, but for otherwise healthy patients aged 18 to 65, it can be an ideal solution and an excellent alternative to fusion surgery. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)
Braxton said cervical artificial disc replacement is not for everyone, but for otherwise healthy patients aged 18 to 65, it can be an ideal solution and an excellent alternative to fusion surgery. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)

After an initial, more traditional surgery in late January 2021, Errico said much of his hip pain had dissipated, and he was even able to snowboard a bit during closing week at his local hill. But the neck pain was still a big issue, and Braxton arranged to provide Errico the disc replacement surgery on April 23.

“I was literally out by 1:30 p.m. that day, and I spent some time afterward in a neck brace that was more awkward than painful. Dr. Braxton gave me great advice to walk as comfortably as I could to get the blood moving, and I was able to leave town the next day.”

A fast and full recovery is the goal
Errico said the results were fantastic, and immediate. “It could not have gone better,” he said. “I do five sessions of PT a week and am walking two to four miles a week, and the range of motion in my neck is just about normal. My goal was always 100% to get back to what I was doing, and they’ve said I don’t have to change anything when I am completely healed. That’s been very exciting for me.”

Realtor Teddy Errico is looking forward to returning to his active mountain lifestyle skiing, golfing and wake boarding after recovery from a cervical artificial disc replacement performed by Dr. Ernest Braxton at Vail Valley Surgery Center. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)

Braxton said the procedure is not for everyone, but for otherwise healthy patients aged 18 to 65, it can be an ideal solution and an excellent alternative to fusion surgery.

“The primary advantages are faster recovery, as there are no screws or plates involved, and fewer incidents of reoperations being necessary,” he said. “Also, there’s less incidence of pseudoarthrosis, which occurs when fusion fails to heal.”

Art Spotlight: Marianne Boesky Gallery

Antone Könst, “SunDown,” 2020, Oil and acrylic on canvas, 114" x 50" - 289.6 x 127 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York.
Antone Könst, “SunDown,” 2020, Oil and acrylic on canvas, 114″ x 50″ – 289.6 x 127 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York.
Marianne Boesky Gallery

100 S. Spring St., Aspen
212-680-9889
www.marianneboeskygallery.com

Marianne Boesky Gallery’s mission has been to represent and support the work of contemporary international artists of all media since its inception in 1996. The Aspen location, opened in 2017, presents rotating exhibitions by both gallery artists and artists invited to present special projects. This summer, the gallery is pleased to feature solo presentations by artists Simphiwe Mbunyuza, Danielle Mckinney, Forrest Kirk, and Antone Könst.

On view from June 10 – July 25, 2021, Marianne Boesky Gallery presents an exhibition of new ceramic works by South African artist Simphiwe Mbunyuza, Uthango, in the gallery’s first floor space. Mbunyuza’s sculpture explores relationships and interactions within African cultural symbolism and cultural day to day objects usedby African groups, particularly Xhosa people. In the gallery’s second floor space, a presentation of new paintings by Danielle Mckinney are on view June 24 – July 25, 2021. Mckinney creates narrative paintings that often focus on the solitary female protagonist. Engaging with themes of spirituality and self, her paintings uncover hidden narratives and conjure dreamlike spaces, often within the interior domestic sphere.

From July 29 to September 12, 2021, the gallery presents solo exhibitions of works by Antone Könst and ForrestKirk. Könst is a painter and sculptor working primarily in figuration. His work, often depicting a singular emotive figure suspended in action, examines the tensions between the heartfelt and playful, and seeks to express the psychological complexities of contemporary life. Kirk’s bold and chromatically diverse paintings are achieved using a variety of media ranging from oils and acrylic to bubble wrap, fabric, and Gorilla Glue. His images often reference psychological uncertainty and anxiety arising from underlying power structures, specifically those experienced in contemporary urban settings. For more information, visit marianneboeskygallery.com, or email info@boeskygallery.com, 212-680-9889.

Art Gallery: Aspen Grove Fine Art

Britten, “Daring”, Mixed media, 40" x 50". Photo courtesy Aspen Grove Fine Art
Britten, “Daring”, Mixed media, 40″ x 50″. Photo courtesy Aspen Grove Fine Art
Aspen Grove Fine Art

Open daily and evenings
525 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen
970-925-5151
www.aspengrovefineart.com

Aspen Grove Fine Arthas been an Aspen institution for more than 35 years. Part of a family-owned and operated group of galleries that originated in Denver, Aspen Grove Fine Art has sister galleries in Santa Fe, Vail, Beaver Creek, Santa Fe, Denver and Dallas. While the collective shares many artists, each location has its own most collected and top selling artists and unique flavor. This affords Aspen Grove Fine Art the ability to curate art pieces for clients from a large cache of nationally and internationally acclaimed artists.

Additionally, staff is versed in all facets of operation, with many working together for more than 20 years. From speaking with the owner daily and personally knowing the team who does all the custom framing for the group in Denver, there is a sense of family and community that is also the cornerstone in interactions with clients. Aspen Grove Fine Art is known for a welcoming and friendly atmosphere, with patrons becoming friends who return each season to grow their collections.

Aspen Grove Fine Art shows artists with honest and impressive credentials, as well as constantly finding new talent to keep the showplace exciting. Artists also become like family, and many, such as James Jensen, have been showing with Aspen Grove Fine Art for decades.

“Aspen Grove Fine Art has allowed me to grow without boundaries, which in turn fosters truly exciting and innovative art,” says Jensen. “The perfect relationship between an artist and their representation is constructed of trust, anticipation and the love of art.”

As a special event this summer, contemporary pop artist DeVon will be featured at the gallery over the July 4th holiday. DeVon merges painting, photography and printmaking into bold collages, celebrating consumer society with wit and optimism.

Aspen Grove Fine Art takes pride in finding the perfect piece of artwork for your home. Whether it’s a piece for a new home or a home needing a new piece, they are ready to help you collect something you love.

Art Spotlight: Harvey Preston Gallery

Kevin Snipes
, “Boy on Bike,” 2020, 
Porcelain, glaze, underglaze, oxide wash, 6.5" x 9.5" x 3". Photo courtesy of Harvey Preston Gallery
Kevin Snipes, “Boy on Bike,” 2020, Porcelain, glaze, underglaze, oxide wash, 6.5″ x 9.5″ x 3″. Photo courtesy of Harvey Preston Gallery
Harvey Preston Gallery

Monday – Saturday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday noon to 5 p.m.
57 E. Hopkins Ave., Aspen
970-920-7721
www.harveypreston.com

Ceramicist Sam Harvey, owner of Harvey Preston Gallery, first came to Aspen as an artist in residence at the Anderson Ranch Art Center’s world-renowned ceramics studio. His residency led to working as the studio manager and, eventually, being inspired to open a gallery with then business partner Alleghany Meadows due to Aspen’s active and well-educated arts community.

Harvey Preston Gallery specializes in contemporary art, including ceramic art, works on paper and sculpture in a natural light-filled gallery. The gallery works with nationally and internationally recognized talent, highlighting artists willing to push the boundaries of their ideas and materials.

“Ceramics can be anything. It arrives as a lump with no desire to be anything,” says Harvey. “Whatever it becomes, it reflects the intention of its maker.” Harvey loves how democratic clay is as a material that can be used to make large sculptures, utilitarian bowls and plates and even bricks used to build buildings.

This summer the gallery is featuring all new works, with a focus on innovative beauty, by three ceramicists, Sanam Emami, Kevin Snipes and Del Harrow. Emami is working on large format tiles with syncopated patterns and an “off the charts” sense of color according to Harvey. Snipes works in porcelain and creates little vessels that share narrative stories. The stories wrap around the colorful and innovative form and are drawn out slowly, like a movie. Harrow creates large and super clean work. He’s showing beautiful concrete and ceramic benches with orbs and large sculptures.

“All three artists are literally creating works as we speak, and I’m excited about seeing what’s been on their minds,” says Harvey.

Seeing, touching and experiencing ceramics is essential to Harvey because he says clay has a presence about it that can mirror your own when you approach it. When you visit Harvey Preston Gallery, expect to find an environment that allows you to connect to the creative pulse of artists engaged in the ideas and aesthetics of this cultural moment in time.

Art Spotlight: Galerie Maximillian

Damien Hirst, “Tyloxapol,” 2010, Woodcut, 36 1/2" x 48". Photo courtesy of Galerie Maximillian
Damien Hirst, “Tyloxapol,” 2010, Woodcut, 36 1/2″ x 48″. Photo courtesy of Galerie Maximillian
Galerie Maximillian

Monday – Saturday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
or by appointment
602 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen
970-925-6100
www.galeriemax.com

Over his 40-year career, Albert Sanford, owner of Galerie Maximillian, has always believed in one standard when buying art: “If I’m not willing to hang

a piece in my own home, it does not deserve a place on the walls of my gallery, or in my client’s home.”

It is this passionate, personal relationship to art and the experience of collecting that makes Galerie Maximillian one of Aspen’s finest. Here you will find work by some of the world’s most coveted artists, both Modern and Contemporary, housed in an environment that is lively, welcoming and engaging. Clients become friends and visit the gallery season after season, year after year. This is a priceless relationship rooted in trust.

“Our customers have confidence in our expertise and they appreciate the fact that we are one of the longest running galleries in Aspen,” says Sanford. “Established in 1997, we are committed to spending time with our clients, helping them build quality collections that they can enjoy and be proud of for generations.”

Galerie Maximillian changes installations frequently, so it is almost guaranteed that you will see something new every time you visit.

Summer 2021 will kick-off with “New British Editions,” June 1st – July 19th that will include works by Damien Hirst, Anish Kapoor, Idris Khan, Michael Craig Martin, Harland Miller, Julian Opie, Grayson Perry and Clare Woods. “Sarah Graham: Recent Works,” July23 – August 15 will feature floral ink drawings that will take your breath away. The artist has created a unique body of work featuring a collection of dahlias in her sumptuous style in glorious colors and compositions. Each drawing is hand-painted with organic pigments on handmade paper pieced together that allows her to use her favorite materials and adds artistry to the works. The artist will be in attendance for a book signing August 2 – 4 from 3-5 p.m. (by appointment only). RSVP to 970-925-6100 or art@galeriemax.com.

Art Spotlight: Anderson Ranch Arts Center

The Painting, Drawing & Printmaking Studio at Anderson Ranch Arts Center. Photo courtesy of Anderson Ranch Arts Center
The Painting, Drawing & Printmaking Studio at Anderson Ranch Arts Center. Photo courtesy of Anderson Ranch Arts Center
Anderson Ranch Arts Center

Monday – Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
5263 Owl Creek Road, Snowmass Village
970-923-3181
www.
andersonranch.org

Founded in 1966, Anderson Ranch Arts Center is a premier destination in America for art making and critical dialogue, bringing together aspiring and internationally renowned artists to discuss and further their work in a stimulating environment. Its mission is to enrich lives with art, inspiration and community.

The 5-acre campus hosts extensive workshops for aspiring, emerging and established artists, children and teenagers in eight disciplines, including Photography & New Media, Ceramics, Painting & Drawing, Furniture Design & Woodworking, Sculpture, Printmaking and Digital Fabrication.

“We are an oasis, a maker’s paradise, but also leading the way in technology and our facilities,” said Katherine Roberts, Director of Marketing and Communications. “We are known internationally as a place where very sophisticated, world-famous artists come to create and engage with the community.”

Events include virtual and in-person workshops, lectures, Q&A sessions with world-renowned artists, collectors and art world luminaries, as well as free public events, such as gallery exhibitions, art auctions and culinary events in the Ranch Cafe. Guests may also enjoy
an outdoor sculpture exhibition and many virtual events and workshops.

In addition to the Summer Series, Featured Artists & Conversations, the Ranch hosts engaging events throughout the year including Recognition Week, held in honor of Anderson Ranch’s International Artist Award and Service to the Arts Award honorees, and a year-round Artists-in-Residence Program, fostering artistic growth for emerging and established visual artists.

Learn more at www.andersonranch.org or by calling 970-923-3181.

Art Spotlight: Raven Gallery

Rich Royal, 
“Teal and Purple Lens”, Hand blown glass, 19”h x 18”w x 18”d. Photo courtesy of Raven Gallery
Rich Royal, “Teal and Purple Lens”, Hand blown glass, 19”h x 18”w x 18”d. Photo courtesy of Raven Gallery
Raven Gallery

Monday – Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
433 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen
970-429-4297
info@ravengalleryaspen.com

Walk into Raven Gallery’s 3,500-square- foot space on East Cooper Avenue and you find amazing studio art glass in every technique imaginable. But explore a little further and you’ll discover a curated selection of paintings in different mediums, unique ceramic works and a remarkable collection of extraordinary minerals and crystals.

Recognized as one of the top glass galleries in the country and completely unique in Aspen, gallery staff welcome all visitors, from browsers to collectors. “We represent a range of glass art from entry level to masters, complemented by paintings, ceramics and museum- quality mineral and crystal specimens,” said director of glass Anne Gross. “Our guests are fascinated with the variety of techniques and unusual forms of the different pieces on display. We love sharing our knowledge and questions are always encouraged.”

The owner, an artist herself, has a passion for art that comes with a deep appreciation for how much time and effort it takes. She knows how technically difficult it is to create impeccable pieces of beautiful glass; she’s tried it! Her intention in opening the gallery was to promote those artists who have the talent to make work that marries beauty with light and captures the imagination, and to showcase the rare beauty of nature in the form of fine minerals and crystals.

“The glass art world faced some very specific challenges during the pandemic. Blowing glass is a team effort that just wasn’t an option for much of the past year,” says Anne. “Artists able to work have been dealing with difficulties ranging from sourcing materials to shipping finished work. Just getting pieces into the gallery became a big challenge. It still is to some degree but now we can see the light at the end of the tunnel.”

Given all that, we are thrilled to announce the arrival of gorgeous constructions of color, light and reflection from Japan and the Czech Republic along with incredible blown glass, hot off the fire from several U.S. artists. Cast glass of both “Picasso-esque” variety from Hawaii and glowing, organic form from North Carolina have also landed, and new oil paintings from contemporary realists Scott Fraser and Otto Duecker, dramatic abstract mixed media from Canadian Markian Olynyk and airy encaustics from Jane Guthridge are hung.

It’s all fresh new work for a fresh new season. Stop in and find your perfect piece then let us install it locally or ship it almost anywhere!

Art Spotlight: Keating Fine Art

Gordon Brown, “Colorado River”, Oil on panel 46" x 70". Photo courtesy of Keating Fine Art
Gordon Brown, “Colorado River”, Oil on panel 46″ x 70″. Photo courtesy of Keating Fine Art
Keating Fine Art

Monday – Saturday, and always available by appointment.
842 E. Valley Road, Basalt 
(in Willits, next to Whole Foods)
970-925-7042
www.keatinggallery.com

The New West meets the Old West at Keating Fine Art, which opened its gallery in Old Town Basalt in 1998, relocating to downtown Aspen in 2009 before making its way back
 to Basalt — in Willits — in 2015.

The large, well-lit gallery with grand, high ceilings is the perfect space to showcase a large collection, featuring living artists from the American West and vintage estate and Native American jewelry.


Step into the space to experience a relaxed, comfortable vibe where guests are encouraged to browse leisurely.

“We are surrounded by lots of beautiful things, so take all the time you want to enjoy,” says owner Gordon Keating. “If you want a private showing, you can have the whole place to yourself on short notice.”

Keating has been an art collector for as long as he can remember. His passion and appreciation for beautiful, unique works of art has driven the collections at Keating Fine Art for more than 20 years in the Roaring Fork Valley.

“Traditionally, artists work alone in their studios, so they need an advocate who is willing to provide a space and an opportunity,” he says. “I think it’s pretty important to advocate for art.”

Keating Fine Art keeps its website up-to-date and can ship artwork anywhere. New artwork and vintage jewelry, including collectable watches, arrives weekly. Visit the gallery online for current events and happenings.

Art Spotlight: Red Brick Center for the Arts

“Launch Intentions,” Sculpture by Griffin Loop on view at Red Brick Center for the Arts. Photo courtesy of Red Brick Center for the Arts
“Launch Intentions,” Sculpture by Griffin Loop on view at Red Brick Center for the Arts. Photo courtesy of Red Brick Center for the Arts
Red Brick Center for the Arts

June – August, Monday – Friday, 
9am – 5pm and Saturdays 10a.m. – 4p.m.
110 E. Hallam St., Aspen
970-429-2777
www.redbrickaspen.com

Built in 1942 as a schoolhouse, the facility was purchased by the city in 1992 to use as a home for the arts. Now the Red Brick Center for the Arts is a community arts center and gallery, home to nine local nonprofits, 12 artists in residence (who sell their work from their studios), a dance studio and conference room. The organization also has a gallery program, artist lectures, events and develops their own art-focused, youth and adult educational programming.

“We believe in supporting local and regional artists by providing professional opportunities to exhibit and sell artwork, as well as inviting artists to give lectures and teach classes. These efforts contribute to their success and allow for the community to connect with art and artists in Colorado,” says Sarah Roy, executive director of the Red Brick Center for the Arts. “Our exhibition program features painting, photography, printmaking, ceramics, jewelry, installation art, and fiber art. We approach the visual arts in a broad sense and incorporate other forms such as the literary arts and music into our exhibitions.”

Roy, who was watching an artist weld metal as we spoke, shared about the resident artists who hold studio space at the Red Brick. “You’re invited to meet with the artists working in their studios and learn about their process and materials. This offers a personal and intimate experience to buying a work of art.”

This summer, in addition to the local student art show which opened in May, the Red Brick will be presenting works by Matthew Eames, Kristen Friebele, Ami Purser, Linda Lowry, William Weidman through July; Ineffable Green Thing by Anders Johnson and Kristy Odelius through October; as well as a sculpture show on the lawn, with six pieces of artwork, through September.

Located just two blocks from Carl’s Pharmacy, visitors to the Red Brick Center for the Arts will find killer art at all price points, with a big, beautiful park out front, ideal for enjoying a picnic amongst the sculptures.