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Explore 10 Iconic High Country Courses with the Rocky Mountain Golf Card

Golfing allows you to enjoy the best of Colorado’s natural beauty, all while playing a challenging game with friends and family. 

The Rocky Mountain Golf Card helps you make the most of mountain summers. It gives you two-for-one access to the best mountain golf courses in Colorado.

The 2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card returns this season with 10 iconic golf courses in the Colorado High Country. 

For just $79, you and your partner play for the price of one at all 10 golf courses. 

This Rocky Mountain golf card lets you experience the variety of challenges, scenery and restaurants that the best mountain golf courses in Colorado offer. 

With the Rocky Mountain golf card, golfing in the Colorado mountains has never been easier — or less expensive. Each card can save you up to $860. 

Simply reserve a tee time at any of the participating courses, pay one greens fee and bring a companion, who plays free. Each 2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card entitles you to one BOGO-free round of golf at every one of the 10 participating Colorado mountain golf courses. If you plan on golfing a few resorts more than once, simply purchase a Rocky Mountain golf card for the best deal. 

2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card
2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card

“My husband and I purchased two cards from you. We used them all the time and want to thank you for offering this to us. It gave us the opportunity to try many different courses in our beautiful Colorado,” Kathy, a Denver resident, said.

Elevate your summer — and golf game — with free rounds at the following Colorado mountain golf courses:

Cedar Ridges Golf Course

Escape the hustle and bustle of it all at Cedar Ridges Golf Course. Located on the outskirts of Rangely, this course sits atop sweeping mesas. The 9-hole, par-36 course leads golfers through large rolling hills and greens, water and sand traps and evergreens. 

Frank Hummel, who has created over 200 courses throughout the United States, designed the course. It offers a minimum of three tee boxes on each hole, making the course challenging enough for any experienced golfer, yet thoroughly enjoyable for novices, as well. 

Don’t miss this hidden gem on the Western Slope. The course is always in immaculate condition and provides a nice pro shop and restaurant. 

“I was extremely impressed with this beautiful course in such a small, remote rural town,” Margaret, a golfer, said. “It’s worth the drive.”

(photo courtesy of Jeff Affleck)
(photo courtesy of Jeff Affleck)

Eagle Ranch Golf Club

Eagle Ranch Golf Club combines top-notch service, exquisite conditioning and an Arnold Palmer Signature Design within the spectacular setting of the Rocky Mountains. 

“What makes it unique to other mountain courses is that you’re still in the mountains with scenic views, but the course is on a flatter piece of land,” said general manager Jeff Boyer. “The most common compliments we get are about the design of the golf course. It plays more fair. It’s not an easy golf course by any means. It’s very challenging, but what you see is what you get. There are no funky bounces or hard to judge (holes).”

The club also welcomes families and kids; the fact that so many people ride their bikes to golf is a testament to its neighborhood warmth.

“It has the characteristics of a higher-end, private course, but it doesn’t have that pretentious atmosphere. It’s friendly, relaxed and welcoming to all,” Boyer said.

(photo courtesy of Glenwood Springs)
(photo courtesy of Glenwood Springs)

Glenwood Springs Golf Club

Voted best 9-hole public course in Colorado by the Denver Post, Glenwood Springs Golf Club is set against a breathtaking backdrop of surrounding mountains and valleys. 

The par-35 course features tree-lined fairways and meticulously manicured greens. Bends and turns on green #5 make it the most challenging to navigate, while #8 makes a hole-in-one the most exciting because you can see the ball soar the entire way.

“The other greens on our par threes are elevated and intriguing,” said general manager Jerry Butler. “Having won the award of Colorado’s number one 9-hole golf course (in 2018), you will be pleasantly surprised by its challenging greens. What you will like most about this club is the people. They are small-town friendly, and everyone will make you feel like you are at home.”

Rollingstone Ranch Golf Club

With a sporty Robert Trent Jones II layout, plenty of wildlife, gorgeous mountain scenery and superb greens, it’s no wonder Golf Digest named Rollingstone Ranch Golf Club at the Sheraton Steamboat Resort one of the best places in Colorado.  

“The course has a great mix of holes where precision is key, but at the same time you can pull driver and let it rip,” said Andrew Donner, director of golf. “Elevation changes are abundant but not extreme. The aspens frame up the golf course perfectly, and with Fish Creek meandering in and out, eye-popping golf shots are plenty.”

In addition, the sound of the roaring creek, the crackling of wood as a deer wanders by, the whistle of a marmot in the distance or a moose swimming across the pond are just standard “distractions” while golfing at the club, he said. “It doesn’t hurt that it is 80 degrees and sunny almost every day.”

Yampa Valley Golf Course

Lined by the lazy Yampa River, Yampa Valley Golf Course weaves through more than 240 acres of cottonwood trees, wetlands, native grasses and sages. 

Located in the heart of northwest Colorado, rolling hills create a gorgeous backdrop at this 18-hole course. 

As the oldest and most affordable facility in the Yampa Valley, the team’s mission is to provide a quality golfing experience wrapped in a friendly and welcoming atmosphere. The experienced, well-trained staff treats everyone like family and delivers outstanding service on its meticulously maintained course.

“(It has a) wonderful staff, beautiful course and some of the best views in the valley,” golfer Andrea Lyn Green posted on Facebook.

Golfer Tom Atkinson, who plays the course annually, aptly describes it as “a fun and unique golf experience.”

(photo courtesy of Haymaker Golf Course)
(photo courtesy of Haymaker Golf Course)

Haymaker Golf Course

What makes Haymaker Golf Course unique is the fact that it’s a traditional, links-style course, located in the middle of the Rocky Mountains. Mount Werner’s snow-capped peak frames many of the holes, while the picturesque Flat Top Mountain Range surrounds the course. Native grasses and wetlands enhance wide-open fairways, and the golf course has earned Audubon International’s Highest Distinction for maintaining the utmost environmental standards. This extraordinary preservation makes the area a great place to spot elk, eagles, blue herons and other wildlife.

Designed by Keith Foster, seven sets of tee boxes allow for play ranging from 7,300 yards to about 5,000.

“It’s a really great layout for every type of golfer,” said head golf professional Cody Hasten.

Meeker Golf Course

Tucked away in the quaint community of Meeker, the 9-hole Meeker Golf Course 

is a small and compact course full of character. Designed by Henry Hughes, it’s surrounded by mountains and livestock pastures. Wildlife is abundant, and it’s not uncommon to see a deer lying on a green.

“The atmosphere is just very casual,” said manager Becky Ridings. “It has the feel of a small-town course. It’s less uptight — no one is rushing you, so people just relax and feel more comfortable.”

“(It’s) a hidden gem, very picturesque,” wrote golfer Mark Tomlinson on Facebook. “The price is good, and (it has) very friendly staff and owners.”

Hole #5 can be the most challenging for golfers new to the course, since doglegs and trees obscure the hole from the men’s tee box. Ridings’ tip: As you go up over #3, look at #5 to get a sense of its layout.

(photo courtesy of Ranch at Roaring Forks)
(photo courtesy of Ranch at Roaring Forks)

Ranch at Roaring Fork Golf Course

Set against a picturesque scene of Roaring Fork Valley’s mountains, the Ranch at Roaring Fork Golf Course offers a well-kept 9-hole, par-3 course. Its authentic Colorado neighborhood vibe makes it perfect for all skill levels and ages, from beginners to scratch golfers.

As the first golf course in Carbondale, the Ranch at Roaring Fork prides itself on being family friendly and community oriented. Its challenging fairways, chipping and putting greens make it a great place to perfect your short game or just spend leisurely time with family and friends. 

Golfer Kevin Blanchard calls it a “fun quick nine before work, (with a) friendly accommodating staff.”

The course’s easy access from Highway 82 makes it simple to slide into almost any schedule. 

“This summer, escape the ordinary and breathe in

the fresh mountain air

as you golf in Colorado’s stunning Rocky Mountains.”

Raven Golf Club at Three Peaks

Considered one of the top courses in the nation by Golf Magazine, golfing at Raven Golf Club at Three Peaks is truly memorable. It features lush, rolling fairways and immaculate greens surrounded by pines, aspens and snow-capped, 13,000-foot mountain peaks. Crystal-clear creeks and lakes punctuate the award-winning course. 

“The Raven Golf Club sits at 9,000 feet in elevation and boasts a 225-foot drop from tee to green at the par 9th hole,” said general manager Ryan Parr. 

While the course is open to the public, it also has the fastest growing golf membership in Summit County, increasing by 115% in the last three years. 

With a full bunker renovation of all 88 bunkers, high-end, white sand in traps contrasts the blue sky and emerald greens.

Rifle Creek Golf Course

Nestled along the Grand Hogback Ridge, Rifle Creek Golf Course provides a unique golfing experience with two distinct 9-hole tracks. Its friendly and expert staff aim to make your golf day a memorable experience — and the views themselves are unforgettable!

This year, golfers voted Rifle Creek #8 in Golfers’ Choice courses in Colorado, as well as one of the top 25 courses in the nation.

“This is one of the best values in the area and the course and all the surrounding views are fantastic — especially the back nine,” commented Golfers’ Choice golfer Captainbadger. 

The open front nine holes weave across the sparkling Rifle Creek, offering a fairly easy walk. The back nine winds through rolling hills with elevated tee boxes. It’s challenging, and provides spectacular mountain views. In addition, its large pro shop has one of the largest selections of clubs, clothing and accessories on the Western Slope.

Rocky Mountain Golf Card

Buy one round and get your partner’s round free: At just $79, it’s your pass to play more — and to save up to $860 this summer.

Quantities are limited, so purchase your pass today at:

Aspentimes.com/golfcard

The 2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card provides free access for golf partners at some of the best mountain golf courses in Colorado.  

This summer, escape the ordinary and breathe in the fresh mountain air as you golf in Colorado’s stunning Rocky Mountains. Every one of the 10 iconic courses on the 2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card offers a different and invigorating experience to shake up your outdoor recreation routine and add more adventure to your season.

5Point Film Festival returns in person

Brought to you by 5Point Film Festival 

Once again, 5Point Film Festival is fostering a sense of community through a shared love of the outdoors.
While the festival went virtual during the pandemic, it’s back and stronger than ever this year, featuring a lineup of 56 short and feature-length films. 

“It’s so important to reconnect the audience and the community through the in-person festival. It’s our biggest priority,” said Luis Yllanes, executive director of 5Point Film Festival. “The magic that makes this organization so special is the ability to connect and gather in person.” 

Professional climber Beth Rodden tackling a boulder problem in Yosemite. Rodden features in 5Point premiere This Is Beth. (photo courtesy of Tara Kerzhner)
Professional climber Beth Rodden tackling a boulder problem in Yosemite. Rodden features in 5Point premiere This Is Beth. (photo courtesy of Tara Kerzhner)

INSPIRATION THROUGH CONNECTION 

The four-day film festival focuses on inspiring audiences through outdoor films, panel discussions, art, music, food, and activities, like a fly-casting competition, bike ride and run and hike event. Over 50 special guests, featuring filmmakers and their subjects to writers and athletes, will attend the festival. 

The festival offers just about something for everyone, from young and older filmmakers to families, nature lovers and af- ter-party revelers. 

It all kicks off Thursday April 21 with the Van Life Rally featuring tricked- out adventure vehicles, live music and food trucks, late night tacos and more. 

Free panels and workshops encompass a variety of topics, from increasing diver- sity in outdoor films to balancing cre- ative work, adventure and family. Jeremy Jensen will talk about finding flow — an optimal state of consciousness in which we feel the most alive — and end with an invigorating bike ride up Prince Creek. The Stio Adventure Filmmakers Pitch Event takes place Saturday afternoon. The inaugural event features seven finalists (out of over 40 entries) pitching their concept to a jury to win $15,000 and premiere their film at 5Point’s 2023 festival. 

A free ice cream social with Sundae’s small-batch artisan ice cream takes place Saturday from 12:30-2:30 p.m., after the Family Film Program. 

A shot from Tom Attwater's Attack and Release which details the life of fly fisherman Ranga Perera. (photo courtesy of Tom Attwater)
A shot from Tom Attwater’s Attack and Release which details the life of fly fisherman Ranga Perera. (photo courtesy of Tom Attwater)

FILM HIGHLIGHTS 

5Point Film Festival’s screenings strive to ignite personal and communal adventure through meaningful storytelling. It was founded on the philosophy that communities improve when residents “pursue adventure and intentionally live their own best story.” Every film revolves around the importance of human connection, while 

imparting profound stories through stunning cinematography.
Feature films tell stories of overcoming one of the most traumatic accidents in the history of rock climbing (“An Accidental Life”), living with a brain tumor and kayaking unprecedented whitewater (“The River Runner”) and themes of death and recovery (“Torn”). 

World premieres feature storm chasing, extreme mountain biking, rock climbing and fly-fishing.
“Their inspiration, creativity, pure joy, incredible athleticism and the sheer entertainment of (all) these programs will recharge you,” Yllanes said. “We’re known to push the limits of what people consider outdoor adventure films.” 

CONTINUAL OUTREACH 

5Point Film Festival is named for its value-based mission, which centers around the five points: Respect for humans, the environment and experience; Commitment to overcome fear and lead a vital existence; Humility to listen to intuition, not ego; Purpose in pursuing one’s highest aspirations even in the face of adversity; and Balance of maintaining focus and energy in life and nature while surrendering to the uncontrollable. 

Scott Lindgren takes the plunge in Rush Sturges' award-winning film The River Runner. Join Sturges for a Q&A after the 5Point screening on Saturday, April 23. (photo courtesy of Eric Parker)
Scott Lindgren takes the plunge in Rush Sturges’ award-winning film The River Runner. Join Sturges for a Q&A after the 5Point screening on Saturday, April 23. (photo courtesy of Eric Parker)

In addition to the annual film festival, 5Point sponsors Dream Project scholarships, which encourage young people to chase their dreams to better the world through a $1,500 scholarship; the 5Point Film Fund, which supports filmmakers and artists; and the free 5Point Student Film Reel, which provides inspirational films for all students and an accompanying resource packet for educators in the Roaring Fork Valley. 

5Point is also expanding its programming year- round to continue to inspire audiences locally and along the Front Range. Through regular programming, 5Point hopes to “have people realize that these are such important points to live by,” Yllanes said. “You’re really taking a step to live a purposeful life. The last two years have challenged us both mentally and physically . 

“With the return of our in-person festival, we continue to champion the creative and authentic stories that 5Point has become known for. Great storytelling is our anchoring source of inspiration and hope in a constantly shifting world.”

5Point Film Festival returns in person

If you go

What: 5Point Film Festival

When: April 21-24

Where: Various venues in Carbondale

Cost: $365 pass or ala carte pricing from $15-$38

More info: www.5pointfilm.org

 

Brought to you by 5Point Film Festival

Once again, 5Point Film Festival is fostering a sense of community through a shared love of the outdoors. 

While the festival went virtual during the pandemic, it’s back and stronger than ever this year, featuring a lineup of 56 short and feature-length films. 

“It’s so important to reconnect the audience and the community through the in-person festival. It’s our biggest priority,” said Luis Yllanes, executive director of 5Point Film Festival. “The magic that makes this organization so special is the ability to connect and gather in person.”

Professional climber Beth Rodden tackling a boulder problem in Yosemite. Rodden features in 5Point premiere This Is Beth. (photo courtesy of Tara Kerzhner)
Professional climber Beth Rodden tackling a boulder problem in Yosemite. She is featured in the 5Point premiere of This Is Beth. (photo courtesy of Tara Kerzhner)

Inspiration through connection

The four-day film festival focuses on in- spiring audiences through outdoor films, panel discussions, art, music, food, and activities, like a fly-casting competition, bike ride and run and hike event. Over 50 special guests, featuring filmmakers and their subjects to writers and athletes, will attend the festival. 

The festival offers just about something for everyone, from young and older filmmakers to families, nature lovers and after-party revelers. 

It all kicks off Thursday April 21 with the Van Life Rally featuring tricked- out adventure vehicles, live music and food trucks, late night tacos and more. 

Free panels and workshops encompass a variety of topics, from increasing diversity in outdoor films to balancing creative work, adventure and family. Jeremy Jensen will talk about finding flow — an optimal state of consciousness in which we feel the most alive — and end with an invigorating bike ride up Prince Creek. The Stio Adventure Filmmakers Pitch Event takes place Saturday afternoon. The inaugural event features seven finalists (out of over 40 entries) pitching their concept to a jury to win $15,000 and premiere their film at 5Point’s 2023 festival. 

A free ice cream social with Sundae’s small-batch artisan ice cream takes place Saturday from 12:30-2:30 p.m., after the Family Film Program. 

A shot from Tom Attwater's Attack and Release which details the life of fly fisherman Ranga Perera. (photo courtesy of Tom Attwater)
A shot from Tom Attwater’s Attack and Release which details the life of fly fisherman Ranga Perera. (photo courtesy of Tom Attwater)

Film highlights

5Point Film Festival’s screenings strive to ignite personal and communal adventure through meaningful storytelling. It was founded on the philosophy that communities improve when residents “pursue adventure and intentionally live their own best story.” Every film revolves around the importance of human connection, while imparting profound stories through stunning cinematography.
Feature films tell stories of overcoming one of the most traumatic accidents in the history of rock climbing (“An Accidental Life”), living with a brain tumor and kayaking unprecedented whitewater (“The River Runner”) and themes of death and recovery (“Torn”). 

World premieres feature storm chasing, extreme mountain biking, rock climbing and fly-fishing.“Their inspiration, creativity, pure joy, incredible athleticism and the sheer entertainment of (all) these programs will recharge you,” Yllanes said. “We’re known to push the limits of what people consider outdoor adventure films.”

Continual outreach

5Point Film Festival is named for its value-based mission, which centers around the five points: Respect for humans, the environment and experience; Commitment to overcome fear and lead a vital existence; Humility to listen to intuition, not ego; Purpose in pursuing one’s highest aspirations even in the face of adversity; and Balance of maintaining focus and energy in life and nature while surrendering to the uncontrollable. 

Scott Lindgren takes the plunge in Rush Sturges' award-winning film The River Runner. Join Sturges for a Q&A after the 5Point screening on Saturday, April 23. (photo courtesy of Eric Parker)
Scott Lindgren takes the plunge in Rush Sturges’ award-winning film The River Runner. Join Sturges for a Q&A after the 5Point screening on Saturday, April 23. (photo courtesy of Eric Parker)

In addition to the annual film festival, 5Point sponsors Dream Project scholarships, which encourage young people to chase their dreams to better the world through a $1,500 scholarship; the 5Point Film Fund, which supports filmmakers and artists; and the free 5Point Student Film Reel, which provides inspirational films for all students and an accompany- ing resource packet for educators in the Roaring Fork Valley. 

5Point is also expanding its programming year- round to continue to inspire audiences locally and along the Front Range. Through regular programming, 5Point hopes to “have people realize that these are such important points to live by,” Yllanes said. “You’re really taking a step to live a purposeful life. The last two years have challenged us both mentally and physically . 

“With the return of our in-person festival, we continue to champion the creative and authentic stories that 5Point has become known for. Great storytelling is our anchoring source of inspiration and hope in a constantly shifting world.” 

High-tech solutions and procedures elevate

Dr. Ernest Braxton, MD, MBA, continues to serve as the only board-certified neurosurgeon in the Vail Valley. “Working with the VSON surgery practices in Vail, Edwards, Frisco, Middle Park and Crested Butte, Dr. Braxton serves the surgical needs of countless patients from across the Colorado High Country.”

Part of his trusted expertise comes in his relentless pursuit of new equipment and innovative procedures, the main objective being a better surgical experience and a shorter, less painful recovery process – with some patients able to resume activities after just a day in the hospital.

“I try to find procedures that are the least invasive as possible,” Braxton said. To that end, he’s been a pioneer in using robotic and computer-assisted surgical techniques as well as regional anesthesia, with a high-tech approach that is centered on faster recovery, and durable relief.

Innovative, adaptive-geometry technology for spinal fusion

Most recently, that includes his use of new spinal fusion devices with “adaptive geometry” – a brand-new, expandable fusion tool that is designed to be more easily integrated to a recovering spinal injury.

VSON is using a brand-new spinal fusion device with “adaptive geometry” and expandable fusion allows patients a fast recovery from spinal injury.
VSON is using a brand-new spinal fusion device with “adaptive geometry” and expandable fusion allows patients a fast recovery from spinal injury.

“The spine’s surface is not one size fits all.  This device conforms better to accept a patient’s anatomy, making it less likely to fail, and leads to less pain,” he said. 

The new adaptive geometry devices are also tiny – approximately 9 millimeters in size, expandable to 14 millimeters – meaning they can be surgically implanted and manipulated through very small incisions. 

Braxton said the new devices, which are made of a titanium-bonded shell integrated with carbon fiber-styled PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone), will be able to replace more traditional fusion devices which frequently cause metal-on-bone wear and fractures.

“They also allow a surgical technique that’s something like gardening through a picket fence or building a ship in a bottle,” he explained. “Rather than having extensive tissue disruption through an open surgery, which can be a painful process, we’re able to leave a lot of tissue in place, as the device is so small.”

Braxton employs a cannula, a tube just 18 millimeters wide, to insert the devices, and uses a high powered microscope to guide and place the adaptive geometry hardware.

Robotic and computer-assisted surgery to ensure perfect results
For these and other procedures, Braxton is now more frequently using robotic and computer-assisted surgical techniques to produce much more precise results – again, the end objective being faster healing and less postoperative pain.

“We use these systems to target and come up with the best solution to help stabilize the spine. The computer system also makes the results reproducible, every time, versus freehand surgery. The best surgeon is like a pro free-throw athlete, with 95% accuracy – this system can push that to 99%, which even the best surgeon can’t beat.”

Dr. Braxton works with VSON surgery practices in Vail, Edwards, Frisco, Middle Park and Crested Butte, Dr. Braxton serves the surgical needs of countless patients from across the Colorado High Country
Dr. Braxton works with VSON surgery practices in Vail, Edwards, Frisco, Middle Park and Crested Butte, Dr. Braxton serves the surgical needs of countless patients from across the Colorado High Country

During his 12 years of surgical practice, Braxton has spent much of his time continually working to explore new techniques and devices. 

“I constantly read about new ideas in medical trade journals, and I recently lectured at a surgical society meeting in Aspen. To learn about the adaptive geometry devices, I flew to the manufacturer in Florida and learned more about it, even practicing the procedures. I also spent time in Phoenix taking robotic training.”

Braxton said he anticipates even more high-tech solutions, all of which are geared at improving outcomes.

“We’re going to see a big wave of technology in the spine space over the next five years. The only real limit will be cost, and we are always aware of being fiscally responsible. For many patients, most procedures have been covered by insurance, as well.”  

In an effort to continually provide the very newest in cutting-edge surgical technology and procedures, all designed to shorten patients’ recovery time, Braxton is noted for being the first surgeon in the Vail Valley to offer the following services:

Awake laminectomy
Awake microdiscectomy
Awake transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion
Placement of intracranial ICP monitor
Craniotomy for subdural
Craniotomy for epidural hematoma
Thoracic laminectomy for spinal cord stimulator placement
Cervical anterior microforaminotomies
Resection of intradural spinal cord tumor
Single position computer-assisted oblique lateral lumbar interbody fusion
Anterior lumbar interbody fusion
Lumbar artificial disc replacement
Outpatient cervical artificial disc
Outpatient spine fusion
First Chiari malformation decompression via suboccipital decompression
Pioneered robotic computer-assisted fusion surgery in Vail
First intercept procedure ablation of basivertebral nerve

Integrated Mountain Group rejuvenates historic Glenwood landmark

Featuring Elms Building after renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group
Featuring Elms Building after renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group

For well over a century, Glenwood Springs has been viewed as an area with great healing potential; in 1903, Dr. W. F. Berry passed through the town and noticed the health resort possibilities it offered with a relatively mild climate and therapeutic mineral waters. He had already built a sanitarium in Michigan, and by 1906, he had moved to Glenwood Springs and constructed a huge hospital on 10th Street. There, doctors did everything from deliver babies to treat disease until 1937, when a businessman bought the building and converted it into an apartment complex. Today, that same building stands as the Elms Apartments, housing local residents.

Featuring Elms Building after renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group
Featuring Elms Building after renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group

Local management and real estate firm Integrated Mountain Group has managed the property since the company’s founding in 2017. They know that maintaining buildings — and restoring historic properties to their prior splendor — adds to the health and wellbeing of a community, both aesthetically and financially. So, last summer, in partnership with the building’s owner, they began the extensive process of renovating the four-level, historic Elms Apartments.

“Glenwood Springs is a small community, and this is a large historic building that’s very visible. It’s part of the fabric of our historic town, and it helps define the town,” said Integrated Mountain co-founder Scott Key. Glenwood Springs has a lot of culture and history, and certainly, a lot of people don’t want to lose that.”

Featuring Elms Building after renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group
Featuring Elms Building after renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group

The Integrated Mountain Management and Maintenance team began transforming the 22-unit apartment complex on the corner of 10th and Bennett by giving it an exterior facelift. Renovation started with new energy efficient windows and doors.

Work expanded to the 14,000 square feet of exterior siding and then moved to the interior with new carpeting throughout, among other upgrades. A palette of warm tones was chosen for the final paint, brightening the formerly weathered-white building.

Featuring Elms Building before renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group
Featuring Elms Building before renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group

Of course, any remodeling project — much less a historic one — has its challenges.

“It was a team effort between our property managers and the full Integrated Mountain Maintenance team” said Suzanne Henry, Integrated Mountain Management leader and co-founder. “It’s an incredible structure, and the process often required more than a dozen staff and local contractors on site for many months. The result has given this historic building a fresh face and new lease on life, befitting this downtown residential location.”

The Elms renovation led not only to improved values for the building, but a positive impact on the neighboring properties and downtown area.

Featuring Elms Building before renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group
Featuring Elms Building before renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group

The Elms Apartments is the second major downtown renovation initiated by the Integrated Mountain Group on a downtown Glenwood historic landmark. The first involved the redesign and rebuild of the former Tamarack building on 10th and Grand, completed with DM Neuman in 2017. The re-christened Integrated Mountain Building now serves as the Glenwood Springs home for Integrated Mountain Properties, Management and Maintenance.

“The Elms renovation is a good example of our partnership and commitment to our customers and community. Since our founding, we have been a strong supporter of dozens of local organizations and non-profits, from education to youth empowerment, sports, and the arts,” said Bob Johnson, senior vice president and co-founder of Integrated Mountain Management. “It’s a wonderful heritage we are building, and the Elms is a very visual example.”

On Our Minds

On September 14, Renew Roaring Fork Assisted Living and Memory Care presents a trio of experts to discuss research, care and living with Alzheimer’s and dementia-related illnesses (Getty Images)
On September 14, Renew Roaring Fork Assisted Living and Memory Care presents a trio of experts to discuss research, care and living with Alzheimer’s and dementia-related illnesses (Getty Images)

Annabel Bowlen didn’t know much about Alzheimer’s Disease until 2012, when she had an encounter with her father Pat Bowlen, former owner and CEO of the Denver Broncos. “I was a student at CU Boulder and went home to study for finals. I thought my dad would be excited to see me. Instead, he was confused and upset I was there. This was very uncharacteristic for him, and I didn’t understand what was going on until my mother pulled me aside and told me.”

After graduation, Annabel dedicated herself to the care of her father, who died of Alzheimer’s related illness in 2019. Today she is now caring for her mother, also named Annabel, who, in a cruel, but increasingly more common twist of fate, was diagnosed with the same disease just a year before the death of her husband.

On Tuesday, Sept. 14, from 5-7 p.m. Annabel Bowlen, known as “Little Bell,” to her family and friends, will discuss what life is like as a caregiver to loved ones navigating this disease, and how caregivers can prevent burnout, in an upcoming Health Series talk at the Renew Roaring Fork Assisted Living and Memory Care center in Glenwood Springs.

The two-hour event, according to Lee Tuchfarber, CEO of Renew Senior Communities, is intended to give guests (both in-person and via webcast) new information in the research of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia-related illnesses.

“So many people are feeling helpless because there are no meaningful pharmaceuticals that exist to treat Alzheimer’s,” notes Tuchfarber. “This discussion will highlight some of the new areas of research that are non-traditional and very promising. It will leave people with hope.”

Joining Bowen in the talk are two representatives from the Knoebel Institute for Heathy Aging at the University of Denver, executive director Dr. Lotta Granholm-Bentley and Dr. Eric Chess, founder and director of the Paul Freeman Financial Security Program at DU.

Dr. Granholm-Bentley has been working with Alzheimer’s disease for 30 years, focusing on new methods of early detection.

“What we look at is not just developing new medication, but how lifestyle changes can be effective in preventing or slowing down the progression of Alzheimer’s,” she says. These include moderate exercise, stress reduction and a “Blue Zones” diet focused on Mediterranean nutrition. “These lifestyle changes are able to cut down the risk of Alzheimer’s by at least 50 percent,” she says. “Eating salmon three times a week increases lifespan by five years.”

One of the key advantages of the work being done at the Knoebel Institute is the cross-disciplinary studies that University of Denver provides. From social work, to business, to psychology, the study of Alzheimer’s disease and its eventual cure, Dr. Granholm-Bentley believes, will depend on several disciplines working together, in addition to healthcare, to find a way forward. Speaking to this component of Alzheimer’s research at the Glenwood event is Dr. Eric Chess, who’s research focuses on a specific, and surprising, early indicator of cognitive decline – financial decision making.

“The earliest cognitive indicator — impaired financial decision making – is often shown decades before any other symptoms,” says Dr. Chess. “Often it’s not the doctors, but certified financial planners, banks and credit card companies that see these decisions that don’t make sense. It’s here we see the earliest signs because financial decision making encompasses a wide array of cognitive tasks — risk assessment, personal implications, decision making, It’s a lot more than the math. You are using a lot of different parts of your brain, simultaneously.”

JOIN RENEW AND ANNABEL BOWLEN, ON SEPTEMBER 14

What: “Promising New Alzheimer’s Research”

When: September 14, 5-7 p.m.

Where: Renew Roaring Fork, Assisted Living and Memory Care, 2800 Midland Ave., Glenwood Springs

Speakers: Lotta Granholm-Bentley, Ph.D, Eric Chess, MD, JD and Annabel Bowlen

For in-person attendance registration, call (720) 679-5528. Event will be held outdoors. Proof of vaccination must be shown at the door. For webinar registration, visit www.renewsenior.com

New advances in cervical artificial disc replacement can lead to revolutionary improvements in motion and mobility

After his neck pain became unmanageable with basic treatment, Teddy Errico explored surgical options and learned about cervical artificial disc replacement with Dr. Ernest Braxton. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)
After his neck pain became unmanageable with basic treatment, Teddy Errico explored surgical options and learned about cervical artificial disc replacement with Dr. Ernest Braxton. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)

The active lifestyle of folks in the High Country certainly produces its share of neck and spinal injuries and lots of accelerated wear and tear. But the good news is that a local specialist can offer an up-to-date, truly world-class solution for many patients, allowing them to return to their busy lives with less pain and without a neck fusion.

Dr. Ernest Braxton, a noted neurosurgeon with offices at Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery in both Eagle and Summit counties, is a leading expert at treatments involving cervical artificial disc replacements. Unlike the old days, where disc fusion surgeries were often the primary solution to disc damage, Braxton said that the newest generation of artificial disc implants can lead to much faster recovery times and marked improvement in both mobility and reduction of pain and discomfort.

“We provide a service for motion preservation, and a big alternative to fusion,” Braxton said. “Disc replacement maintains motion, and reduces and prevents adjacent segment disease. And we’ve had a 90% satisfaction rate –revision surgeries are less common on a disc replacement procedure.”

Dr. Ernest Braxton, a noted neurosurgeon with offices at Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery in both Eagle and Summit counties, is a leading expert at treatments involving cervical artificial disc replacements. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)
Dr. Ernest Braxton, a noted neurosurgeon with offices at Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery in both Eagle and Summit counties, is a leading expert at treatments involving cervical artificial disc replacements. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)VSO Dr Braxton 2 DT 8-27-19 Dominique Taylor/Dominique Taylor Photography

All of that, right here at the Vail Valley Surgery Center, in an outpatient setting that often allows patients to be back to their active lives.

Some real-life experience with artificial disc replacement
Like many Colorado residents, 53-year-old Telluride Realtor Teddy Errico has always played a little too hard – whether that be skiing, hockey, golf, softball or surfing.

“I had a little too much fun over all the years, especially all those fun things we do on the mountain,” Errico said.

Fifteen years ago, trouble began with a herniated C4-5 disc in his neck. Errico said he initially managed with PT visits and a stretching regimen. But by 2019, he had developed severe neck and arm pain that would go away with conservative care.

“I thought I could just grind through the pain, as you do in mountain life, but after getting some relief from a chiropractor visit, it never got better, and my doctor suggested I might need surgery,” he explained. 

COVID-19 complicated Errico’s options, but after talking to a half dozen specialists across the state, Errico got in touch with Braxton and said he was immediately impressed by his approach, and his suggestion of cervical artificial disc replacement.

Errico added “I knew his resume and I was impressed by how unbelievably well you get treated by his staff,”

Braxton said the technology involved in artificial disc replacement has been in existence in the United States since 2007, but the device he now uses was approved by the FDA in April 2021 for two levels. Made of PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) and ceramic, the discs are an artificial ceramic and biopolymer mix that makes them more compatible with MRI scans.

Braxton said cervical artificial disc replacement is not for everyone, but for otherwise healthy patients aged 18 to 65, it can be an ideal solution and an excellent alternative to fusion surgery. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)
Braxton said cervical artificial disc replacement is not for everyone, but for otherwise healthy patients aged 18 to 65, it can be an ideal solution and an excellent alternative to fusion surgery. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)

After an initial, more traditional surgery in late January 2021, Errico said much of his hip pain had dissipated, and he was even able to snowboard a bit during closing week at his local hill. But the neck pain was still a big issue, and Braxton arranged to provide Errico the disc replacement surgery on April 23.

“I was literally out by 1:30 p.m. that day, and I spent some time afterward in a neck brace that was more awkward than painful. Dr. Braxton gave me great advice to walk as comfortably as I could to get the blood moving, and I was able to leave town the next day.”

A fast and full recovery is the goal
Errico said the results were fantastic, and immediate. “It could not have gone better,” he said. “I do five sessions of PT a week and am walking two to four miles a week, and the range of motion in my neck is just about normal. My goal was always 100% to get back to what I was doing, and they’ve said I don’t have to change anything when I am completely healed. That’s been very exciting for me.”

Realtor Teddy Errico is looking forward to returning to his active mountain lifestyle skiing, golfing and wake boarding after recovery from a cervical artificial disc replacement performed by Dr. Ernest Braxton at Vail Valley Surgery Center. (Photo courtesy of Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery)

Braxton said the procedure is not for everyone, but for otherwise healthy patients aged 18 to 65, it can be an ideal solution and an excellent alternative to fusion surgery.

“The primary advantages are faster recovery, as there are no screws or plates involved, and fewer incidents of reoperations being necessary,” he said. “Also, there’s less incidence of pseudoarthrosis, which occurs when fusion fails to heal.”

Art Spotlight: Marianne Boesky Gallery

Antone Könst, “SunDown,” 2020, Oil and acrylic on canvas, 114" x 50" - 289.6 x 127 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York.
Antone Könst, “SunDown,” 2020, Oil and acrylic on canvas, 114″ x 50″ – 289.6 x 127 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York.
Marianne Boesky Gallery

100 S. Spring St., Aspen
212-680-9889
www.marianneboeskygallery.com

Marianne Boesky Gallery’s mission has been to represent and support the work of contemporary international artists of all media since its inception in 1996. The Aspen location, opened in 2017, presents rotating exhibitions by both gallery artists and artists invited to present special projects. This summer, the gallery is pleased to feature solo presentations by artists Simphiwe Mbunyuza, Danielle Mckinney, Forrest Kirk, and Antone Könst.

On view from June 10 – July 25, 2021, Marianne Boesky Gallery presents an exhibition of new ceramic works by South African artist Simphiwe Mbunyuza, Uthango, in the gallery’s first floor space. Mbunyuza’s sculpture explores relationships and interactions within African cultural symbolism and cultural day to day objects usedby African groups, particularly Xhosa people. In the gallery’s second floor space, a presentation of new paintings by Danielle Mckinney are on view June 24 – July 25, 2021. Mckinney creates narrative paintings that often focus on the solitary female protagonist. Engaging with themes of spirituality and self, her paintings uncover hidden narratives and conjure dreamlike spaces, often within the interior domestic sphere.

From July 29 to September 12, 2021, the gallery presents solo exhibitions of works by Antone Könst and ForrestKirk. Könst is a painter and sculptor working primarily in figuration. His work, often depicting a singular emotive figure suspended in action, examines the tensions between the heartfelt and playful, and seeks to express the psychological complexities of contemporary life. Kirk’s bold and chromatically diverse paintings are achieved using a variety of media ranging from oils and acrylic to bubble wrap, fabric, and Gorilla Glue. His images often reference psychological uncertainty and anxiety arising from underlying power structures, specifically those experienced in contemporary urban settings. For more information, visit marianneboeskygallery.com, or email info@boeskygallery.com, 212-680-9889.

Art Gallery: Aspen Grove Fine Art

Britten, “Daring”, Mixed media, 40" x 50". Photo courtesy Aspen Grove Fine Art
Britten, “Daring”, Mixed media, 40″ x 50″. Photo courtesy Aspen Grove Fine Art
Aspen Grove Fine Art

Open daily and evenings
525 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen
970-925-5151
www.aspengrovefineart.com

Aspen Grove Fine Arthas been an Aspen institution for more than 35 years. Part of a family-owned and operated group of galleries that originated in Denver, Aspen Grove Fine Art has sister galleries in Santa Fe, Vail, Beaver Creek, Santa Fe, Denver and Dallas. While the collective shares many artists, each location has its own most collected and top selling artists and unique flavor. This affords Aspen Grove Fine Art the ability to curate art pieces for clients from a large cache of nationally and internationally acclaimed artists.

Additionally, staff is versed in all facets of operation, with many working together for more than 20 years. From speaking with the owner daily and personally knowing the team who does all the custom framing for the group in Denver, there is a sense of family and community that is also the cornerstone in interactions with clients. Aspen Grove Fine Art is known for a welcoming and friendly atmosphere, with patrons becoming friends who return each season to grow their collections.

Aspen Grove Fine Art shows artists with honest and impressive credentials, as well as constantly finding new talent to keep the showplace exciting. Artists also become like family, and many, such as James Jensen, have been showing with Aspen Grove Fine Art for decades.

“Aspen Grove Fine Art has allowed me to grow without boundaries, which in turn fosters truly exciting and innovative art,” says Jensen. “The perfect relationship between an artist and their representation is constructed of trust, anticipation and the love of art.”

As a special event this summer, contemporary pop artist DeVon will be featured at the gallery over the July 4th holiday. DeVon merges painting, photography and printmaking into bold collages, celebrating consumer society with wit and optimism.

Aspen Grove Fine Art takes pride in finding the perfect piece of artwork for your home. Whether it’s a piece for a new home or a home needing a new piece, they are ready to help you collect something you love.

Art Spotlight: Harvey Preston Gallery

Kevin Snipes
, “Boy on Bike,” 2020, 
Porcelain, glaze, underglaze, oxide wash, 6.5" x 9.5" x 3". Photo courtesy of Harvey Preston Gallery
Kevin Snipes, “Boy on Bike,” 2020, Porcelain, glaze, underglaze, oxide wash, 6.5″ x 9.5″ x 3″. Photo courtesy of Harvey Preston Gallery
Harvey Preston Gallery

Monday – Saturday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday noon to 5 p.m.
57 E. Hopkins Ave., Aspen
970-920-7721
www.harveypreston.com

Ceramicist Sam Harvey, owner of Harvey Preston Gallery, first came to Aspen as an artist in residence at the Anderson Ranch Art Center’s world-renowned ceramics studio. His residency led to working as the studio manager and, eventually, being inspired to open a gallery with then business partner Alleghany Meadows due to Aspen’s active and well-educated arts community.

Harvey Preston Gallery specializes in contemporary art, including ceramic art, works on paper and sculpture in a natural light-filled gallery. The gallery works with nationally and internationally recognized talent, highlighting artists willing to push the boundaries of their ideas and materials.

“Ceramics can be anything. It arrives as a lump with no desire to be anything,” says Harvey. “Whatever it becomes, it reflects the intention of its maker.” Harvey loves how democratic clay is as a material that can be used to make large sculptures, utilitarian bowls and plates and even bricks used to build buildings.

This summer the gallery is featuring all new works, with a focus on innovative beauty, by three ceramicists, Sanam Emami, Kevin Snipes and Del Harrow. Emami is working on large format tiles with syncopated patterns and an “off the charts” sense of color according to Harvey. Snipes works in porcelain and creates little vessels that share narrative stories. The stories wrap around the colorful and innovative form and are drawn out slowly, like a movie. Harrow creates large and super clean work. He’s showing beautiful concrete and ceramic benches with orbs and large sculptures.

“All three artists are literally creating works as we speak, and I’m excited about seeing what’s been on their minds,” says Harvey.

Seeing, touching and experiencing ceramics is essential to Harvey because he says clay has a presence about it that can mirror your own when you approach it. When you visit Harvey Preston Gallery, expect to find an environment that allows you to connect to the creative pulse of artists engaged in the ideas and aesthetics of this cultural moment in time.