Tour of Utah cycling race canceled for the third straight year due to coronavirus | AspenTimes.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Tour of Utah cycling race canceled for the third straight year due to coronavirus

Jay Hamburger
Park Record
Competitors in the Tour of Utah climb Main Street as they near the finish. The firm that operates the cycling race, with a final stage that has often been held in Park City, says the event will not occur in 2022.
Park Record file photo

PARK CITY, Utah — The sports management firm that operates the Tour of Utah said on Wednesday it has ended the efforts to hold the cycling race in 2022, an early hit to Park City’s summer-tourism season.

Medalist Sports in a posting on the Tour of Utah website said the decision was made “despite ardent efforts to continue the Tour of Utah.” The firm requested the event be taken off the calendar of international cycling events, the posting said.

The posting included a comment from Chris Aronhalt, who is the Medalist Sports owner and president.



“On-going sponsor and host community discussions have been positive; however not strong enough to support a viable effort to meet our collective expectations,” he said. “While disappointed, Medalist Sports is grateful for the opportunity and cherishes the Tour of Utah’s legacy.”

Aronhalt did not immediately return a phone message seeking comment.




The Larry H. Miller Group of Companies in April said it and Medalist Sports had reached a licensing agreement for Medalist Sports to operate the Tour of Utah.

The Tour of Utah was canceled in 2020 and 2021 based on concerns about the novel coronavirus pandemic. The cancellation in 2020 was widely anticipated as decisions about large events were made in the early months of the spread of the virus, while the 2021 event was dropped in the spring, amid the continued concern.

The Larry H. Miller Group in March indicated the organizers wanted the event to return in 2022. The organizers said the event in 2019 drew 400,000 spectators throughout the course, which stretched through a large swath of northern Utah.

The Park City area had served as the final stage of the race, with the cyclists pedaling toward the finish line of the Tour of Utah on Main Street. The final day of the Tour of Utah, which was usually scheduled in early August, had been an especially busy one on Main Street and the wider Park City area. City Hall closed Main Street to traffic to allow the cyclists to start the final stage and then return for the finish line. The day was a celebration of cycling that attracted thousands for vendor displays and other activities related to the race. Main Street was outfitted with protective barriers and decorated for the event.

City Hall-compiled information dating to the approval process of an earlier edition of the Tour of Utah indicated a survey conducted by organizers for the 2016 event showed the race generated more than $22 million in economic impact in the state. The information did not identify a figure for the economic impact on Park City or Summit County, but it was likely an outsized amount since the local crowds were especially large. Numbers for more recent years were not immediately available.

Park City’s summer-tourism season has traditionally offered a mix of sporting events and cultural gatherings as draws to complement the outdoors activities, festivals, shopping and dining. Economic numbers in the two summers of the pandemic were strong even after cancellations like those of the Tour of Utah.

citynews@parkrecord.com


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Aspen and Snowmass Village make the Aspen Times’ work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.

 

Outdoors

Longtime X Games star Gus Kenworthy confirms retirement after Olympics

One of the most beloved and outspoken X Games athletes in history is ready to cross the finish line. Gus Kenworthy, who grew up partially in Telluride, confirmed that this week’s contest at Buttermilk Ski Area and next month’s Winter Olympics in China will be the last of his storied career.



See more