History: Skiing is a feeling | AspenTimes.com

History: Skiing is a feeling

“‘Skiing is like loving. It is a feeling. You don’t need any light. It’s a feeling of freedom and movement and indescribable joy for the blind skier.’ That’s how Jean Eymere, founder of Bold (Blind Outdoor Leisure Development) feels about it and knows so well. Jean became blind three years ago [1971] and continued his skiing so that now other blind people can enjoy the same feeling” described an article in the Snowmass Affairs magazine, February 1974. “Through Jean and his friends’ efforts and the support of the Aspen Lions Club, Aspen BOLD was born, four years ago [1970]. It has become a community project aimed at bringing to the blind the joys and thrills of skiing. ….In that first year, with Jean skiing as a blind skier down the area mountains, BOLD drew quite a bit of publicity as a new, novel thing. CBS did a 3-minute spot on Jean and Detroit did a 15-minute segment. Ed Lucks had started a program at Snowmass for amputee skiers and that drew a certain amount of attention. Other handicapped people, including blind, sought out Ed who directed them to BOLD. Before Aspen BOLD there was no one set program for the blind skier. Here and there at various mountains, individual instructors were trying to help the blind who came to them. But Aspen BOLD became the first organized program for blind skiers.” Image showing Ed Lucks guiding a blind woman down Fanny Hill circa 1980.


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