Abortion and a woman’s right to choose | AspenTimes.com

Abortion and a woman’s right to choose

In his response to my column “A larger view of this life,” Chris King’s column (“Using desperate fantasies to justify abortion,” Feb. 8, 2017, The Aspen Times) graciously acknowledges the value of my work, and the hundreds of people it has helped. May our discussion of the central issues raise awareness and result in fewer unwanted pregnancies.

Unfortunately, Mr. King’s “morality and compassion for the unborn” seeks control of women. I don’t advocate for more abortions; I support women’s rights to choose according to their beliefs. It’s fine to express views, but not OK to force them on others.

He implies that women’s fulfillment is immaterial, or at best a secondary consideration that cannot alter his absolute belief. Some women have aspirations besides, or in addition to, motherhood. These women believe they deserve joy, and they disagree that career is only a vehicle to promotions and fine vacations. Work can be a way for them to contribute, and fulfillment can result.

One of the women I helped was studying engineering until she got pregnant. When we met she was working in an unfulfilling insurance job, having had to give up her studies. She loves her children. They also sense her frustration. A mother’s happiness benefits her children. Happiness is more likely when those who choose motherhood also choose the timing. Birth control restriction is the next and inevitable step to controlling women and is often falsely described as an abortifacient, that is, a form of abortion.

Mr. King hasn’t met my clients of whom I write, but he claims these women trade love for promotions and fine vacations. Even if this were true, who’s to judge another’s desires and aspirations?

The “light of scientific understanding and reason” evolves constantly. Yesterday’s “mythology” can become today’s science as we learn and evolve. Lightning, once “magic” only wielded by the gods, is now understood as electricity. Our understanding of it continues to evolve but the incomplete state of our understanding does not render it mythical or imaginary.

Jane St. Croix Ireland

Aspen


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.