dotComments: Immigrant workers a hot topic | AspenTimes.com

dotComments: Immigrant workers a hot topic

The impact of Colorados new immigration law on employers set off debate among online readers of The Aspen Times last week.A Sept. 5 article, Contractors weigh in on new immigration bill, detailed the thoughts of area construction contractor Mark Gould, who is having trouble filling job openings, given new rules that require him to certify his workers are legal. Without immigrant workers, the valleys supply of excavators, laborers, masons, concrete workers, etc. would shrivel, since Americans dont want the jobs, Gould suggested.Readers responded at http://www.aspentimes.com.Said one: No, its not a matter of Americans not filling the jobs. Why should businesses hire Americans if all the jobs that need to be filled only require a third grade education? For one thing these people are not immigrants, and when this country is being pushed over the cliff of globalism into a benign service oriented stuper of a society, sure bitch it up and hire a bunch of illegals. Is that the future of your America? Maybe for you, but please don’t make a habit of it. The American people realize that this type of growth is not healthy for America no matter the short term profit gain. Let America naturally evolve instead of allowing its spirit to be suffocated by greed and corruption.Offered another, in part: As United States federal law states right now, it is ILLEGAL to hire illegal aliens, PERIOD!Businesses, including contractors, which employ illegal aliens, to increase their profit margin, should, by law, pay the fine, or do the time.Where do people like Gould get off thinking that they don’t have to abide by the laws of this land?Hiring illegal aliens has nothing to do with filling jobs “Americans won’t work”, it has everything to do with greed, pure and simple, lower payroll, higher profits, not having to pay employee taxes, benifits, insurance, higher profits. After a reader took a swipe at Explore Booksellers & Bistro This holier-than-thou book joint with an overpriced snack bar is a critical component of Aspen’s soul? others came to the Aspen bookstores defense.Responded one: “Anonymous” clearly walks by without ever going into Explore, and certainly hasn’t the capacity to make use of what this landmark offers. Well, maybe the one ashamed to admit an identity may have tried eating there once or twice. Explore provides Aspen with access to a remarkable range of books and music recordings. Its survival is far more important to the character of this town than even the many shops and restaurants we have watched disappear. And, there was this:Speak for yourself- Explore is a wonderful haven right in the center of town for the mind through its unique collection of books cards, musis, the soul through its wonderful atmosphere which hasbeen improved upon by its dedicated owners and staff year after year and in a style faithful to the victorian, old west heritage of Aspen, and to the body through very helathy and delicious food- in these three ways. it is consistent with the Aspen Idea that pervades many of Aspen’s long lived I=institutions–nurturing body, soul and mind. Maybe you shoul dget a life or at least not judge those who find Explore to be a magnificent concept and cherish the time spent there. To call it an overpriced snack bar is truly an insult and reflects more on the commenter’s style than anything else. On the subject of sheriff candidate Rick Magnusons green platform, one reader had this to say:Sure, Mr. Magnuson is green. Green with envy for the love and support this community has for Bob Braudis. Finally, our Sept. 7 editorial, Lets keep climate change a community cause, prompted this response:If Aspen wants to bring its per capita contribution of greenhouse gases into line with the rest of the country (which wouldn’t be anything to brag about) the runway at the Pitkin County Airport should be designated as an HOV lane, to be used only by small propeller-driven aircraft or jets carrying no fewer than 20 people. Online readers of The Aspen Times may weigh in on any article, anonymously, if they wish, by clicking on Comments at the top of the article. Comments chosen for publication here appear as they were posted, without editing or correction.