Adriana Ayala-Hire: Guest opinion | AspenTimes.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Adriana Ayala-Hire: Guest opinion

Adriana Ayala-Hire
Special to The Aspen Times
Aspen, CO, Colorado

Last week was busy indeed for our Basalt High School Longhorns.

Math students were learning how to use geometry, trigonometry and proportion to solve real-world problems such as calculating the height of a building or determining how long it would take to paint a house.

English students were analyzing a film to then write a persuasive paper for their University of Colorado English class.

Photography students were in the darkroom carefully developing their black-and-white photographs.

Science students were getting the extra help they needed with their lab write-ups.

On Thursday night, students showed up to support our basketball team in its last home game against rival Aspen wearing Hawaiian shirts in memory of a classmate as well as supporting a cancer benefit for two former Longhorns.

While many students were busy at school, others decided to take their learning outside of the classroom: Talented young men participated in the Colorado Regional Science Fair at Colorado Mesa University, where two of them qualified for the state science fair with one student advancing for his three-year study of the effects of pine beetles on local forest ecology – quite advanced scientific inquiry that rivals any study done by university students.

Leadership students also traveled to Colorado Mesa University and participated in a conference where they learned how to empower their peers to make a difference in their communities.

A different group traveled to the state Capitol to partake in the Latino Youth Advocacy Days conference, where one of our Longhorns opened the event with an eloquent and passionate speech while standing on the Senate floor.

On Friday, Basalt High School musicians performed at the district honor jazz band and choir event sponsored by Jazz Aspen Snowmass.

Last but not least, our National Honor Society students quietly impacted our communities by “hanging out with kids.” But not just ordinary kids. They spent their evenings socializing with autistic participants of the Extreme Sports Camp, a camp for autistic children and adults.

The aforementioned is a sample of the rich learning environment facilitated by our staff for our students in one week. This week has been no different. Our students are busy learning math, English, science and government while exploring their artistic talents and aptitudes in an environment that nurtures what they know and empowers what they can become.

Do not be surprised to spot a Longhorn doing something good for others in our community or reading in the news about the great colleges they will attend next fall. They are busy doing amazing things every day, everywhere. We are the Basalt Longhorns!


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Aspen and Snowmass Village make the Aspen Times’ work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.

For tax deductible donations, click here.
 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User


Columns

Paul Andersen: Airport housing in Aspen leads to airport grousing

|

“Many of these stoic commuters endure brain-numbing traffic jams so they can service vacant mega homes, making sure all the lights are on and that the snowmelt patios, driveways, sidewalks and dog runs are thoroughly heated so as to evaporate that bothersome white stuff that defines Aspen’s picturesque winter landscape and ski economy,“ writes Paul Andersen.



See more