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Yes on 1A

On Nov. 5, Ballot Referendum 1A, asking for mill levy support for a number of Health and Human Services will come before the voters.

At first I was resistant to the idea of any kind of levy, but when I was apprised of the significant cutbacks that would ensue if the monies were not available, I changed my mind. Senior and youth programs would be impacted as well as a host of other human services and nonprofit groups.

For example, seniors would lose out on many fitness, wellness and educational programs; YouthZone (a diversion program for youth in trouble) would lose essential funding. The list goes on.

The amount of levy is modest, being $4.20 per $100,000 value of residential property. The levy has been collected for the year and would continue to be collected an additional four years for a total of five years. No added levy would occur during this period.

The cause is beneficial for our community. It will give us needed time to come up with alternative funding methods. By voting on 1A you will mandate that the monies go to the dedicated services and nonprofits and nothing else.

Please vote yes on Question 1A on Nov. 5.

Harold C. Whitcomb, MD

Senior Services Council Member


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