A national day dedicated to dogs | AspenTimes.com

A national day dedicated to dogs

Barbara Platts

The day has almost arrived. This Sunday, Aug. 26, is big. Our social media feeds will be filled with images of cute, adorable, irresistible dogs of all sizes and shapes.

Everyone who owns a dog, has a friend who owns a dog, has considered adopting a dog, or has ever exclaimed "Awwww," when seeing a dog will probably be posting this Sunday about man's best friend.

Why, you may ask? Because it's National Dog Day!

OK, OK, stay with me here. I know this isn't that big of a deal. I've written before about the silliness of national days and months. There's certainly a surplus of them. For example, though Aug. 26 is National Dog Day, it's also National WebMistress Day (what?), National Women's Equality Day (yes!) and National Cherry Popsicle Day (ya, OK, sure).

Since there are so many national days, I think it's totally acceptable to pick and choose the ones that you want to celebrate. Or, if you think the whole idea is utterly ridiculous, don't celebrate any of them. And, forget Christmas too while you're at it, you curmudgeon (just kidding … kind of).

It seems like just about anything can become a national day. Just look at NationalDayCalendar.com or Chase's Calendar, the loose gatekeepers for national day requests. According to one of the co-founders of NationalDayCalendar.com, the site gets more than 10,000 requests for national days per year, but they only approve 20 to 25.

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National Dog Day was created by animal advocate Colleen Paige, who also founded National Puppy Day (March 23), National Mutt Days (July 31 and Dec. 2), and National Cat Day (Oct. 29). While National Dog Day is considered one of the best days to shamelessly post pics of our dogs on social media, it was originally founded for other reasons. According to NationalDogDay.com, the day's mission is "to help galvanize the public to recognize the number of dogs that need to be rescued each year and acknowledges family dogs that work selflessly each day to save lives, keep us safe and bring comfort." So, while these national days often seem silly (and a lot of the time they are), there's often a nice message behind them that many of us can relate to. And, since 48 percent of U.S. homes have dogs, according to the American Pet Products Association, there are a lot of people who can appreciate a national holiday dedicated to furry friends.

If you read my column regularly, you probably know a decent amount about my pups. Cash and June (pictured several times above) are the pride and joy of my life. June is now 1 year and 4 months old and Cash turns 4 this month. We're not really sure of his exact birthday so we just tend to be celebratory toward him for all of August.

June and Cash are both rescues, but my boyfriend and I have been lucky enough to have them since they were puppies. We adopted Cash from the Aspen Animal Shelter and June from the Lifeline Puppy Rescue on the Front Range. In just about every way, these pups have brightened up our lives. They're always up for a good time, whether that be hiking a 14er or taking a long nap on the couch. So, I figured for National Dog Day, I would give a shoutout to both of my babies. Thankfully they're photogenic enough to handle all of the shameless posting I'll be doing of them Sunday.

Barbara Platts already has her images picked out to post on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook for National Dog Day. Yes, it's obsessive, but she doesn't mind. Reach her at bplatts.000@gmail.com or on Twitter @BarbaraPlatts.

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