Vaccines safe, reliable | AspenTimes.com

Vaccines safe, reliable

Dear Editor:

Someone needs to stand up for science and reason in the face of the bad “facts” in the opinion article by Jeanne McGovern regarding swine flu vaccine (“To vaccinate or not?” Oct. 25, 2009, Aspen Times Weekly). The research is clear and unequivocally accepted by the scientific community. Vaccines are a safe and reliable way to prevent death and injury from preventable diseases. Period.

The thimerosal link to autism has been disproven by science and courts of law. To not vaccinate yourself and your children against a preventable, possibly deadly disease is unconscionable in my view. Boo and hiss to Dr. Mitchell for giving a supposedly scientific backing to this hogwash. You must know better. Vaccines are not a “personal” decision. That would imply that your decision does not affect anyone else, but this is sadly not so.

We are in the battle against all diseases as a group. No vaccine is 100 percent effective, and it is only though herd immunity that we can protect the weakest of us. Not only does the anti-vaccine crowd risk their own children, they also risk all of us, and I find that unacceptable. Again, the science is clear. I cringe when I see otherwise reasonable people spout this nonsense.

To make any sort of argument against vaccination is to put yourself in the intellectual company of those who deny the science of global warming, doubt the occurrence of the Holocaust or believe that the moon landing was a hoax. (Or better yet, remember the chem-trail lunatics?)

The CDC is not a shadowy, military-industrial complex out to steal your dollars and enslave you. They are good, reasonable, smart and very educated people who have dedicated their lives to our well being. In the interest of good journalism, I call on The Aspen Times to do an in-depth interview with an infectious disease specialist from the CDC and actually perform a real public service as journalism is intended to do.

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Kevin Heinecken

Snowmass