Twist emerges in Aspen attempted-murder case | AspenTimes.com

Twist emerges in Aspen attempted-murder case

ASPEN – An Aug. 6 incident that sparked an attempted-murder charge against an Aspen man also has resulted in a restraining order against a woman who called police to report the alleged crime.

On Thursday, Senior Judge Cecil Wayne Williams blessed a permanent protection order that prohibits Karen Kincaid, who is in her 50s, from having contact with Terry Decker, 62. Both are residents of Truscott Place, though Kincaid faces eviction proceedings from the affordable-housing complex.

Decker allegedly was stabbed by Marc Altman, 48, who has been jailed since the incident on a $50,000 bond and faces attempted murder in the second degree, second-degree assault causing serious bodily injury and two counts of first-degree criminal trespassing.

Police say that Kincaid, meanwhile, called authorities to report that Altman came by her apartment after the alleged stabbing. There, Altman told Kincaid that he had stabbed Decker in the back, police allege.

Kincaid also told police that she saw “multiple stab wounds” on Decker’s back, which prompted her to call authorities about the incident.

After police responded, Decker was transported to Aspen Valley Hospital where she was treated for a stab wound in her lower back.

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Kincaid is listed as a witness for the Pitkin County branch of the 9th Judicial District Attorney’s Office in its prosecution of Altman. But as far as Decker is concerned, she wants nothing to do with the woman who called police.

In her application for a protection order against Kincaid, Decker accused her neighbor of stalking her. Decker also referred to the night in question in which she allegedly was stabbed.

“This occurred at my apartment,” Decker wrote in court documents as part of her restraining-order application. “(Kincaid) came into my apt., uninvited, intoxicated and woke me up. I woke, as I had been sleeping, and realized I was bleeding. I wanted her to leave me alone, she called the police, I did not realize what happened.”

Decker’s admission that she was bleeding runs counter to what she allegedly told police. Officer Peter Bauer reported that Decker told him that she had not been stabbed and was not bleeding. Decker also told The Aspen Times that the incident was not a “big deal” and she was neither hurt nor stabbed.

But in her restraining-order application, Decker wrote that when she returned from the hospital she was “still in shock, weak from lack of blood.”

That’s when Kincaid allegedly visited Decker’s apartment again, saying her hands from covered with blood and apologizing. This all happened in front of Decker’s 10-year-old granddaughter and her friends, Decker wrote.

“I told her not to do this in front of my granddaughter,” Decker wrote. “Then she wanted me to give her a pain pill because her back hurt. I wouldn’t so she said I was trying to control her.”

Decker went on to write that Kincaid has spent numerous evenings outside of her apartment “at all hours of the night and it’s a pretty creepy thing. I can’t have her there at all. She wears this hoodie that makes it really weird.”

With the restraining order in place, Kincaid can’t be within 100 yards of Decker or her home. She also is banned from having any contact with Decker – be it texting, phone calls, emails, and so on.

“There are no exceptions,” Williams told Kincaid at a hearing Thursday in Pitkin County Court.

Kincaid made no efforts to fight the protection order.

“I have no problem with it,” she told the judge. “I’m happy to have made the court date.”

Decker also has legal problems of her own.

She’s due in Pitkin County District Court on Sept. 17 for a plea hearing in connection to criminal charges she faces for allegedly striking Altman with a hammer in April.

rcarroll@aspentimes.com