Those unruly Aspenites | AspenTimes.com

Those unruly Aspenites

Dear Editor:Over the years since my return to Aspen and its surrounding environs many residents, visitors and tourists comment about the bad manners they experience in Aspen. Yes, some even go further to include snobbery, too.There are a number of two-legged adult creatures roaming around Aspen who could surely use proper etiquette to improve their social stature with civilized people. The pre-teenage children misguided creatures rear are so disrespectful and unruly; their uncivilized behaviors are openly condoned by their boorish parents and other boors these brats hold up in high esteem.And what I mention about poor social graces that proliferate amongst many pre-teenage Aspen children and both their ill-mannered parents and/or guards applies to a select number of Aspen shopkeepers and their employees who also need to read books on etiquette.Ill-mannered families tend to breed ill-mannered children whose contagious diseased social dysfunctional behavior multiply the ugly reflection that are the norm in their unbred lives and social circles.When well-mannered people practice proper social conduct and hold their ground against the ill-mannered, civilized conduct shines and is a guiding light to follow and cheer.As former British Consul General Merrick Baker-Bates used to say when he served in Los Angeles, “Good manners make life so much nicer.” I appreciated his appearance on my cable television show “Caviar & Class – Deluxe” and the Episcopal Bishop Garden Party I attended at his home in Hancock Park in Los Angeles. A copy of the Honorable Baker-Bates being a guest on “Caviar & Class-Deluxe” is with the government of Great Britain. Some gifts become priceless, and they include good manners, too.Class will show and tell, don’t you agree? Emzy Veazy IIIAspen and Burbank, Calif.