The season that wasn’t in Colorado’s peach country | AspenTimes.com
YOUR AD HERE »

The season that wasn’t in Colorado’s peach country

Some farmers in Palisade lost their entire crop this year

Josie Sexton
The Denver Post
A ripened peach sits ready for picking at High Country Orchards near Palisade, Colorado, on July 16, 2009.
William Woody, Special to The Denver Post

From market stands to restaurant menus, anyone looking around Denver at the end of summer can see proof of Colorado’s peach harvest. But some 200 miles west, in swaths of the state’s peach-growing capital, the tractor-trailers have all but stopped running and the farm workers have largely gone home.

“Usually I would see 15 or 20 trucks a day leaving the peach-packing facilities, and I haven’t seen one in several days,” Palisade farmer Scott High told The Denver Post last week. “We would sell in excess of a million pounds of peaches (normally), and we’re not selling any this year. So there’s a million pounds less just from our company alone.”

At High’s 188-acre High Country Orchards — and many other farms in Mesa County — the peach crop was decimated this year literally overnight, when a freeze early in the morning of April 14 caught the trees’ blossoms by surprise and sent farmers into a panic, the likes of which they hadn’t experienced in over 20 years.

During an already trying year, Colorado peach farmers watched this summer as crop yields swung wildly between zero and 100%. For consumers around the state, that meant less of a precious summer commodity — the Palisade peach — but more fruits filling in from the state’s other peach-growing parts.

Read the full story via The Denver Post.


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Aspen and Snowmass Village make the Aspen Times’ work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.

For tax deductible donations, click here.
 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User


News

No more ‘second’ fire season

|

In the aftermath of the Grizzly Creek Fire in and around Glenwood Canyon, Eric Lovgren has been “swamped” with calls and emails, primarily from people in the Eagle and Gypsum areas where residents could see flames from the Grizzly Creek Fire as it grew toward the Coffee Pot Road.



See more