The mayor for 2C | AspenTimes.com

The mayor for 2C

Dear Editor:Here are the facts on Ordinance No. 22, Series of 2006 that provide for the redevelopment of the recycle center.City Council passed this ordinance upon recommendation of the Recycle Center COWOP, task force. This COWOP task force appointed by the City Council included representatives from City Council, city planning and zoning commission, Obermeyer Redevelopment Company, skate park users, neighbors, citizens-at-large, city of Aspen Parks Department, and the Pitkin County Solid Waste Center. It had the benefit of professional staff and technical resources. Task force meetings were open to the public with opportunity to comment. This review process did not deny any public hearing, public notice, or any critical analysis or scrutiny of the project. The task force considered the goals and requirements of a redeveloped recycle center that would improve operations and convenience of use, and be a model for green design.For nearly 20 years, the recycle center has been in the same location at the edge of Rio Grande Park. In 1993, City Council officially designated this location for the recycle center, and earlier this year City Council reaffirmed this location for the recycle center. The redevelopment does not take new park land, but enhances the park as anticipated by the Rio Grande Master Plan and the Civic Center Master Plan.The current estimated cost of the recycle center redevelopment is approximately $737,000, not $1 million. Obermeyer rental payments to the city will provide approximately $375,000. The Obermeyer project was a public-private partnership. Its approvals provided for participation in the redevelopment of the recycle center. CORE has awarded a $50,000 grant to this project. City tax dollars will provide the remainder or approximately $312,000. There are two three-sided structures to cover the bins. Two fit better on the site, allow for future expansion of the skate park and break up potentially objectionable massing. These structures have Gabbion walls (wire mesh filled with recycled rock on three sides). The open sides allow airflow and light, and access to the bins.There are ramps to accommodate wheelchairs. The covered bins and glasscrete road surface create a cleaner and more inviting facility, and with berms and trees, the appearance of the center is significantly improved for neighbors, trail and street users, and the community.The one-way in and one-way out design was agreed upon after input from recycle haulers, and professional advisors to the task force. Elimination of a second curb cut across the sidewalk improves safety by avoiding unnecessary vehicle and pedestrian conflicts.Aspen and Pitkin County residents have been committed recyclers for almost two decades. It is the city’s responsibility to provide for essential public services. I believe the community agrees recycling is an essential public service. The improvement of the recycle center to make it a cleaner, more inviting facility to encourage recycling is an appropriate and wise investment of public funds.But don’t simply take my word for it. Please examine the plans for this facility for yourself. They can be viewed at City Hall in the front lobby or at the recycle center. If you have further questions, please call me at 925-2796 or e-mail me at solitude@rof.net. I hope you will join me and vote YES on city of Aspen Referendum 2C.Helen KlanderudMayor, city of Aspen