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Snowpack above normal in Roaring Fork River Basin

Pete Fowler
Glenwood Springs correspondent
Aspen, CO Colorado

GLENWOOD SPRINGS ” Snowpack in the Roaring Fork River Basin is still above average but isn’t as robust as it was last year at this time.

On Tuesday morning it was 129 percent of a 29-year average. Last year at this time it was 150 percent of the average.

Snowpack in the Upper Colorado River Basin was 119 percent of a 29-year average Tuesday morning, down from a peak in late December. It was 94 percent of last year’s snowpack at this time, according to Natural Resources Conservation Service snow survey supervisor Mike Gillespie.

“We’re tracking below where we were a year ago in most parts of the state,” Gillespie said. “We were at our highest percent of average around the state in late December. We lost a bit of ground during January.”

But last year’s winter produced the most snow anyone remembers since the early 1980s.

A monitoring site on Independence Pass recorded snowpack at 132 percent of average Tuesday morning. McClure Pass was at 119 percent of average, and Vail Mountain showed 117 percent of average. About a month ago on Jan. 26, Independence Pass was up to 145 percent of average snowpack.

Colorado as a whole was sitting on about 114 percent of its average snowpack, Gillespie said.

A Feb. 3 NRCS snow survey and water supply report called the snowpack “encouraging news to the state’s water users” and said spring and summer water supplies are “generally expected to be near to slightly above average this year.”


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