Snowmass history: Tower of power | AspenTimes.com

Snowmass history: Tower of power

The Snowmass Mall circa 1970. The Tower Restaurant is in the foreground and cars and busses are in the background.
John M. Smith/Aspen Historical Society archives |

“Meet … Howard and Marian Englander,” the Snowmass Villager wrote Feb. 1, 1968. On their way west from New York to California to purchase a radio station, Howard read about KSNO and was “amazed” such a small town as Aspen had its own station. “Howard wrote to KSNO owner William Dunaway to apply for a job to gain experience with small-time radio before heading on to California and was hired to do announcing and sales work. And they stayed on. ‘Aspen’s such a groovy place’ Marian explains. ‘The other small towns we visited had small-town people.’  The Englanders also moved next door to the Roland Herbergs and were introduced to the Snowmass Project and to Snowmass personnel, firming their decision to stay. In addition to running the Tower, Howard is advertising manager for Snowmass-at-Aspen but will resign this job Feb. 15 to return to freelancing in the field of public communications. He will continue to do consulting for Snowmass. … The Fondue Restaurant was something the Englanders had thought of for three years and Howard describes it as a real ‘Mama and Papa operation.’ Howard is out front to greet guests and Marian makes all the sauces, some 30 different kinds, and oversees the kitchen operations. Howard describes her ability in the kitchen as fantastic for a former travel agent and girl guide. The running of a restaurant is like an Italian marriage, he says, with husband and wife working together. The Fondue Bourguignonne featured at The Tower is a tradition at atmospheric restaurants in Zermatt, Murren, Verbier and other Alpine villages in the Swiss Alps, Howard said.”  


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