Shortfest: The schedule | AspenTimes.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Shortfest: The schedule

Aspen Times Staff
A hungry rodent is the star in an animated farce, Gopher Broke, showing at Shortsfest. (Courtesy Aspen Filmfest)
ALL |

Forget feature length its all about the short film when Aspen Shortsfest returns April 5-9 with a selection of short films from around the globe.Aspen Shortsfest 2006 brings a new slate of short films to Aspen and Carbondale, along with such special presentations as Bob Rafelson: Confessions of a Filmmaker, Part II; and Jason Reitman and his new feature, Thank You for Smoking, in the Directors Spotlight.Tickets go on sale to the general public on March 29 at the Wheeler Box Office (920-5770) or wheeleroperahouse.com, as well as at Sounds Easy in Carbondale (963-1303). Tickets are also available at the door, pending availability.From premieres to Academy Award-nominated shorts, this year’s International Competition runs the gamut. Forty-nine finalists will be screened for the public when they compete for a record $28,000 in cash and other prizes, according to Aspen Filmfest.ScreenPlay!, the Shortsfest family program, offers a selection of animated and live action films for young audiences on Sunday, April 9 at the Wheeler Opera House in Aspen.A rundown of the screenings and special programs, shamelessly plucked straight off the Filmfest website (aspenfilm.org) looks like this:ASPEN FILMFEST 2006 THE SCHEDULE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5International CompetitionWheeler Opera House, Aspen, 5:30 p.m.PROGRAM ONE(Screening order to be announced)Beyond Iraq In this inspiring documentary, wounded veterans return stateside to fight a different battle on the slopes of the Colorado Rockies. (Tom Eldridge, USA, 8 min.)Happy Birthday Yemima Believed to be the reincarnation of her late grandmother, Yemima plays the role with devotion. Caring for her father and siblings, she never gives her strange pattern of living a second thought until the day her kitchen sink goes on the blink. (Yishai Orian, Israel, 19 min.)Look for Me What’s it like to be invisible? Told through handmade patterns and digital animation, this whimsical meditation on desire follows a woman as she wanders around unseen. (Laura Heit, UK, 4 min.)Lucky A recently-orphaned South African boy leaves his Zulu village for the bright lights of Durban. His unwelcoming uncle warns him of the fiercely ill-tempered lady next door. But given a tape of his mother’s last words, Lucky has to find somewhere to play it…. (Avie Luthra, UK, 20 min.)Under the Roller Coaster For thousands, the Thunderbolt Roller Coaster was an icon. For Mae Timpano, it was home – literally. A touching portrait of one woman’s Coney Island history and her attachment to the way things used to be. From the director of Each One Teach One (SF05). (Lila Place, USA, 15 min.)The Whistler Tweetie and Sylvester move over. This contemporary take ups the ante on a classic stand-off between cat and bird. (Layla Aktinson, UK, 1 min.)

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5International CompetitionWheeler Opera House, Aspen, 8:15 p.m.PROGRAM TWOBadgered A pair of pesky crows disrupts a grumpy badger’s quest for sleep. But they are the least of his worries in this droll and surprisingly pertinent Oscar-nominated animation. (Sharon Colman, UK, 7 min.)Bawke Two refugees long on the run arrive at their destination only to discover their troubles have just begun. A powerful drama about one father’s quest to provide for his son. (Hisham Zaman, Norway, 15 min.)Herr Goldstein A young nurse brightens a 93-year-old man’s routine when she delivers a letter from a long-lost friend. A tender story about love, loss, and finding companionship where you least expect it. (Micha Lewinsky, Switzerland, 17 min.)Moongirl One night a fish catches a boy and his flying squirrel and takes them to meet the Girl in the Moon. A delightfully rendered, CG-animated tale about the moon’s light source and other cosmic questions. (Henry Selick, USA, 9 min.)Smitten Meet Ren di Rosa, an unusual art collector whose objective is neither to enhance interior design nor increase social status. Rather, his pure joy of discovery leads him to amass the world’s largest collection of Northern Californian contemporary art. At 85, this tireless enthusiast searches on for the next emerging artist. (Nancy Kelly, USA, 27 min.)Starry Night Beauty, desire, and heart connection are in the air as a lonely art historian (Miranda Richardson) prepares for her perfect evening: a date with troubled genius Vincent Van Gogh. (Ben Miller, UK, 13 min.)THURSDAY, APRIL 6Special PresentationWheeler Opera House, Aspen, 5:30 p.m.Bob Rafelson: Confessions of a Filmmaker, Part II (2 hours) After an illuminating program, Bob Rafelson: Confessions of a Filmmaker, Part I, presented at Filmfest last fall, the filmmaker is back to engage in another conversation that will include discussion of new clips, as well as his experiences making shorts. Full of thoughtful reflections and observations about the craft that’s focused his passions for nearly 50 years, Rafelson is a lively, generous and amusing raconteur. As a director (Five Easy Pieces, The King of Marvin Gardens) and producer (Easy Rider, The Last Picture Show), Bob was instrumental in reinvigorating American cinema. He charted new territory with The Postman Always Rings Twice and Mountains of the Moon.

PROGRAM THREEInternational CompetitionWheeler Opera House, Aspen, 8:45 p.m.Crash In this quirky, colorful tale, a young couple’s playful rediscovery of bumper cars takes a strangely revealing turn. From the director of Oscar-nominated 7:35 in the Morning (SF04). (Nacho Vigalondo, Spain, 10 min.)Antonio’s Breakfast Fourteen floors up and feeling trapped, Antonio cares for his severely disabled father. In this touching drama, a torn teenager begins his school day caught between family duty and friends. (Daniel Mulloy, UK, 16 min.)At the Quinte Hotel A flower-loving barfly waxes lyrical in this visually compelling, collage-style tribute to the late Al Purdy’s celebrated poem, read by the iconoclastic bard himself. (Bruce Alcock, Canada, 4 min.)Dealbreaker Having suffered countless dating disasters, Fran believes she has finally found her soul mate. An amusing urban story about one woman’s determined search for Mr. Right. (Gwyneth Paltrow & Mary Wigmore, USA, 13 min.)Dog Years Chapter 2 – Health Name: Ben. Species: Dog. Sex: Male. Symptoms: Itchy bum. Recommended treatment: Surgery. The waggish sequel to Dog Years (SF05). (Sam Hearn & Richard Penfold, UK, 4 min.)s on for the next emerging artist. (Nancy Kelly, USA, 27 min.)K-7 In this clever comedy, a job interview turns deadly when one man rates a mysterious “K-7” on his psychological profile. (Christopher Leone, USA, 18 min.)Tempo! 24/7 is given the full treatment in this fast-paced portrait of two young professionals juggling work, marriage, and family. (Eva F. Dahr, Norway, 10 min.)Vaudeville An intriguing visual poem whose surreal imagery and random events evoke a memory landscape of a Korea long since passed. (Chansoo Kim, South Korea/USA, 4 min.)FRIDAY, APRIL 7Special Presentation: Director SpotlightWheeler Opera House, Aspen, noonA Conversation With Jason Reitman (90 min.) This year’s choice for Director Spotlight, Jason Reitman was born to make movies, especially funny ones. At the tender age of 11 days, he found himself on the set of Animal House. By age 10, he was making shorts with the family video camera. Jason’s first paid film gig came with Kindergarten Cop; he was 13. Flash forward to last fall when Jason premiered his debut feature, Thank You for Smoking, at the Toronto Film Festival; it also showed at this years U.S. Comedy Arts Festival in Aspen. (This screen adaptation of Christopher Buckley’s best-selling satire, featuring an all-star ensemble cast, screens Sunday, April 9.) The Directors Spotlight offers an onstage conversation with Reitman, in which hell talk about his experiences directing shorts and commercials, and screen some of his work.

FRIDAY, APRIL 7Crystal Theatre, Carbondale, 5:30 p.m.PROGRAM ABadgered A pair of pesky crows disrupts a grumpy badger’s quest for sleep. But they are the least of his worries in this droll and surprisingly pertinent Oscar-nominated animation. (Sharon Colman, UK, 7 min.)Beyond Iraq In this inspiring documentary, wounded veterans return stateside to fight a different battle on the slopes of the Colorado Rockies. (Tom Eldridge, USA, 8 min.)The Danish Poet In this fairy tale misadventure, a young bard in search of inspiration goes to Norway to meet his favorite author and instead sets off an amusing sequence of accidental encounters. Narrated by Liv Ullman, the latest charmed tale from the director of My Grandmother Ironed the King’s Shirts (SF00). (Torill Kove, Canada/Norway, 15 min.)Happy Birthday Yemima Believed to be the reincarnation of her late grandmother, Yemima plays the role with devotion. Caring for her father and siblings, she never gives her strange pattern of living a second thought until the day her kitchen sink goes on the blink. (Yishai Orian, Israel, 19 min.)Herr Goldstein A young nurse brightens a 93-year-old man’s routine when she delivers a letter from a long-lost friend. A tender story about love, loss, and finding companionship where you least expect it. (Micha Lewinsky, Switzerland, 17 min.)If There Were No Lutherans . . . Would There Still Be Green Jell-O? One man. One sign. This humorous documentary shows how an offbeat Lutheran pastor changes his corner of the world – and local traffic patterns – one churchyard sign at a time. (Gayle Knutson, USA, 12 min.)Last Stop Even preoccupied passengers on an everyday trolley ride cannot ignore the anxieties of current events. From the director of In Your Dreams (SF05). (Greg Williams, Australia, 5 min.)Mr. Price Some people can change your life. James contacts a favorite old teacher in this cleverly animated reflection on memory, expectation, and hero-worship. (Tim Webb, UK, 9 min.)FRIDAY, APRIL 7International CompetitionWheeler Opera House, Aspen, 5:30 p.m.PROGRAM FOURA Conversation with Basquiat Shortly before his untimely death at 27, notoriously elusive artist Jean-Michel Basquiat gave a candid interview in which he spoke about his personal history, meteoric rise to fame, and thoughts on art and race in America. This illuminating snapshot of one of contemporary art’s brightest flames is interspersed with rare footage, including the painter at work. (Tamra Davis, USA, 21 min.)ramos Pocos Faced with an unexpected departure, Joaquin and his stayat- home adult son resort to a unique strategy to restore domestic happiness. But who is being fooled in this deadpan comedy? (Borja Cobeaga, Spain, 16 min.)Gopher Broke A hungry rodent hatches a clever scheme to shake loose spoils from a passing vegetable truck. But things don’t go according to plan in this funny, animated farce. (Jeff Fowler, USA, 4 min.)The Great Zambini Images speak eloquent volumes in this magical story about a father who dusts off the remnants of his faded glory to win back his detached son. (Igor Legarreta & Emilio Prez, Spain, 14 min.)Last Stop Even preoccupied passengers on an everyday trolley ride cannot ignore the anxieties of current events. From the director of In Your Dreams (SF05). (Greg Williams, Australia, 5 min.)Sidewalls Can two lonely city-dwellers ever find each other? From Buenos Aires apartments and streets to internet chat rooms, the lovelorn characters of this beguiling light drama seem fated to a search for love in all the wrong places. (Gustavo Taretto, Argentina, 28 min.)FRIDAY, APRIL 7Crystal Theatre, Carbondale, 8 p.m.PROGRAM AA repeat of the 5:30 p.m. screenings.

FRIDAY, APRIL 7International CompetitionWheeler Opera House, Aspen, 9 p.m.PROGRAM FIVEHeavy Metal Drummer A teenage, metal-head misfit rocks the Arab world in this amusing tale of one music fan’s quest to follow his metallic muse despite a disapproving society. (Luke Morris & Toby MacDonald, UK, 6 min.)Jellybaby Jack and Jill had a great relationship. Then they had a baby. Comparing his chronic crier to quieter kids, Jack is driven to comically desperate lengths to make life normal again. (Ronan & Rob Burke, Ireland, 10 min.)The Last Chip Madam Fang, Mrs. Nguyen and Sister Ah Lan are three old friends who have little in common save for unfulfilled dreams. When they venture out for a lively night at the local casino, fortune deals them an unexpected hand. (Heng Tang, Australia, 22 min.)The Love Train Set in a mythical landscape in the Age of Steam, a lovelorn lady dragon searches for a mate. But can she find one she won’t melt? A quietly evocative tale about the search for compatibility told in hand-drawn animation. (Eva Bennett, UK, 8 min.)Monster A single mother has reached the breaking point over her son’s obsession with a scary doll he insists is real. Then one night she spies something in the corner of a closet. Is it moving? (Jennifer Kent, Australia, 10 min.)Mr. Price Some people can change your life. James contacts a favorite old teacher in this cleverly animated reflection on memory, expectation, and hero-worship. (Tim Webb, UK, 9 min.)Out of the Woods Three old friends at a crossroads prepare for what appears to be a routine hunting trip into the Vermont woods. Confronted by tragedy, how far will they really go? (Samuel Dowe-Sandes, USA, 20 min.)River Crossing Based on a true story, this tender visual essay dramatizes a childhood memory of two sisters on a family holiday in northern Finland. (Marina Willer, UK, 7 min.)SATURDAY, APRIL 8MasterworksWheeler Opera House, Aspen, noonIn The Directors Chair (2 hrs.) An afternoon with a group of directors whose broad spectrum of styles and experiences is likely to fuel a lively discussion. As they screen clips from their features, these filmmakers will talk about taking the screenplay to the screen, working with actors, collaborating, and more. Awardwinning writer-director Frank Pierson (Presumed Innocent, A Star Is Born) returns to moderate a dialogue on the art and craft of film. So far, confirmed guests include Oscar-winner Paul Haggis (Crash), Mark and Michael Polish (Northfork), and Peter Segal (The Longest Yard).

SATURDAY, APRIL 8 International CompetitionWheeler Opera House, Aspen, 5:30 p.m.PROGRAM SIXBe Quiet A behind-the-headlines story of an Israeli-Arab father and his strong-willed young son’s trip home to the city of Nazareth. The tension that pervades the conflicted landscape they navigate steadily seeps into their car. (Sameh Zoabi, Palestine/France, 19 min.)The Danish Poet In this fairy tale misadventure, a young bard in search of inspiration goes to Norway to meet his favorite author and instead sets off an amusing sequence of accidental encounters. Narrated by Liv Ullman, the latest charmed tale from the director of My Grandmother Ironed the King’s Shirts (SF00). (Torill Kove, Canada/Norway, 15 min.)The Fan and the Flower A poignant love story about a ceiling fan and a flowerpot longing to consummate their relationship. Narrated by Paul Giamatti and directed by perennial Shortsfest favorite Bill Plympton. (Bill Plympton, USA, 7 min.)If There Were No Lutherans . . . Would There Still Be Green Jell-O? One man. One sign. This humorous documentary shows how an offbeat Lutheran pastor changes his corner of the world – and local traffic patterns – one churchyard sign at a time. (Gayle Knutson, USA, 12 min.)Rajkumari Young Nayna is brimming with excitement. Today she travels to the city to spend a day with her father. Visiting the zoo, going to the movies – a day full of promise becomes one she will never forget. A coming-of-age story with a rich sense of place. (Victoria Harwood, India/UK, 18 min.)Small Boxes A young Hispanic-Australian lives with his family outside Sydney and works the night shift at a produce market. On an outing with his grandmother, he discovers an unexpected opportunity, and a buried hope is awakened. A compelling departure from the director of In Too Deep (SF05). (Rene Hernandez, Australia, 15 min.)spen, 5:30 p.m.PROGRAM SIXBe Quiet A behind-the-headlines story of an Israeli-Arab father and his strong-willed young son’s trip home to the city of Nazareth. The tension that pervades the conflicted landscape they navigate steadily seeps into their car. (Sameh Zoabi, Palestine/France, 19 min.)The Danish Poet In this fairy tale misadventure, a young bard in search of inspiration goes to Norway to meet his favorite author and instead sets off an amusing sequence of accidental encounters. Narrated by Liv Ullman, the latest charmed tale from the director of My Grandmother Ironed the King’s Shirts (SF00). (Torill Kove, Canada/Norway, 15 min.)The Fan and the Flower A poignant love story about a ceiling fan and a flowerpot longing to consummate their relationship. Narrated by Paul Giamatti and directed by perennial Shortsfest favorite Bill Plympton. (Bill Plympton, USA, 7 min.)If There Were No Lutherans . . . Would There Still Be Green Jell-O? One man. One sign. This humorous documentary shows how an offbeat Lutheran pastor changes his corner of the world – and local traffic patterns – one churchyard sign at a time. (Gayle Knutson, USA, 12 min.)Rajkumari Young Nayna is brimming with excitement. Today she travels to the city to spend a day with her father. Visiting the zoo, going to the movies – a day full of promise becomes one she will never forget. A coming-of-age story with a rich sense of place. (Victoria Harwood, India/UK, 18 min.)Small Boxes A young Hispanic-Australian lives with his family outside Sydney and works the night shift at a produce market. On an outing with his grandmother, he discovers an unexpected opportunity, and a buried hope is awakened. A compelling departure from the director of In Too Deep (SF05). (Rene Hernandez, Australia, 15 min.)

SATURDAY, APRIL 8Crystal Theatre, Carbondale, 5:30 p.m.PROGRAM BHeavy Metal Drummer A teenage, metal-head misfit rocks the Arab world in this amusing tale of one music fan’s quest to follow his metallic muse despite a disapproving society. (Luke Morris & Toby MacDonald, UK, 6 min.)At the Quinte Hotel A flower-loving barfly waxes lyrical in this visually compelling, collage-style tribute to the late Al Purdy’s celebrated poem, read by the iconoclastic bard himself. (Bruce Alcock, Canada, 4 min.)Bawke Two refugees long on the run arrive at their destination only to discover their troubles have just begun. A powerful drama about one father’s quest to provide for his son. (Hisham Zaman, Norway, 15 min.)For Interieur Criquet loves his grandfather, a genuine memories collector who dreams of flying away but not before leaving his grandson a pure moment of eternity. (Patrick Poubel, France, 10 min.)The Great Zambini Images speak eloquent volumes in this magical story about a father who dusts off the remnants of his faded glory to win back his detached son. (Igor Legarreta & Emilio Prez, Spain, 14 min.)Look for Me What’s it like to be invisible? Told through handmade patterns and digital animation, this whimsical meditation on desire follows a woman as she wanders around unseen. (Laura Heit, UK, 4 min.)Sidewalls Can two lonely city-dwellers ever find each other? From Buenos Aires apartments and streets to internet chat rooms, the lovelorn characters of this beguiling light drama seem fated to a search for love in all the wrong places. (Gustavo Taretto, Argentina, 28 min.)Tempo! 24/7 is given the full treatment in this fast-paced portrait of two young professionals juggling work, marriage, and family. (Eva F. Dahr, Norway, 10 min.)SATURDAY, APRIL 8Crystal Theatre, Carbondale, 8 p.m.PROGRAM BA repeat of the 5:30 p.m. screenings.SATURDAY, APRIL 8International CompetitionWheeler Opera House, Aspen, 9 p.m.PROGRAM SEVENDo You Want the Elephant Music It’s not about the ring. This cinematic tour de force takes us behind the tent-flap and into the hearts of a band of circus performers, exploring how their hopes, dreams, and reality mirror our own. (Leslie Dektor, USA, 17 min.)Dupe A decidedly lazy young slacker, Adam buys a cloning machine on eBay to copy himself in hopes his double will tidy up. Is this, like, genius or what? (Chris Waitt, UK, 11 min.)Flea! This child prodigy has a wild story to tell. Her surrogate mother stole her from her intended parents . . . and that’s a good thing. But a trip to the beach might prove difficult with an angry black-market adoption broker on their tail. (Christine Wiederkehr, Switzerland, 16 min.)Hibernation A stirring, bittersweet story about two boys hiding out in their homemade treehouse, earnestly conducting a topsecret experiment to waken a hibernating bee. What is their bigger mission? (John Williams, UK, 15 min.)Sea Change A meditative landscape study that reveals how light and time transform an everyday setting resonating with transient human presence. (Joe King & Rosie Pedlow, UK, 5 min.)Stealth Lunch In this animated micro-short, a wily fox deploys high-tech tactics to chase down his equally clever feathered archrival. (Layla Atkinson, UK, 2 min.)Wolves in the Woods As one boy counts, children scatter into the woods and five year-old Katrina finds the perfect hiding spot. But for one of its unintended players, this innocent game may have deadly consequences. (B.J. Schwartz, USA, 6 min.)Your Dark Hair Ihsan A young man returns to his homeland to reclaim his past. Powerful yet gentle, this evocative work explores the ebb and flow of past and present, memory and history, departure and return. (Tala Hadid, USA/Morocco, 13 min.)SUNDAY, APRIL 9Screenplay!Wheeler Opera House, Aspen, 1 p.m.FAMILY PROGRAMScreenPlay! offers younger viewers (age 10 and up) a trip around the world and beyond with a special selection of entertaining shorts. The program includes three very different pieces of animation, including an Oscar-nominated tale of a grumpy badger (Badgered), a boy’s chance meeting with Moongirl, and a resourceful, hungry rodent (Gopher Broke). The live-action offerings show how children live in different cultures and include a tale of a German girl’s dangerous game of hide-and-seek (Wolves in the Woods), a hilarious portrait of a young Middle Eastern musician (Heavy Metal Drummer), and a touching story of a Basque father who brings magic into his detached son’s life (The Great Zambini).SUNDAY, APRIL 9Special PresentationWheeler Opera House, Aspen, 3 p.m.Screenwriter Frank Pierson presents Dog Day Afternoon (2 hrs.) Well received when it was first released, this seminal film is renowned for its outstanding performances, masterful handling of daring subject matter, and definitive, gritty portrayal of the hysteria bred by one hot New York summer. Frank Pierson won the Oscar in 1975 for his groundbreaking script about a failed bank-robber (Al Pacino) who, driven by love for his transgender partner (Frank Cazale), becomes the unwitting voice in a larger social drama. Based on true events, writing this script was no easy task. Aided by key film clips, Pierson will deconstruct the writing of Dog Day Afternoon. He will talk about how he did the research and shaped the material into a feature film script, as well as his working relationships with director Sidney Lumet and the cast. He’ll discuss the moral and ethical issues involved in making a movie about living people and real events, explaining how he dealt with them. Revolutionary for its time, Dog Day Afternoon reminds us of an era when studios hired writers for their bold take on political issues and helped finance movies that mattered.SUNDAY, APRIL 9Crystal Theatre, Carbondale, 7 p.m.PROGRAM CBe Quiet A behind-the-headlines story of an Israeli-Arab father and his strong-willed young son’s trip home to the city of Nazareth. The tension that pervades the conflicted landscape they navigate steadily seeps into their car. (Sameh Zoabi, Palestine/France, 19 min.)The Fan and the Flower A poignant love story about a ceiling fan and a flowerpot longing to consummate their relationship. Narrated by Paul Giamatti and directed by perennial Shortsfest favorite Bill Plympton. (Bill Plympton, USA, 7 min.)Gopher Broke A hungry rodent hatches a clever scheme to shake loose spoils from a passing vegetable truck. But things don’t go according to plan in this funny, animated farce. (Jeff Fowler, USA, 4 min.)

Hibernation A stirring, bittersweet story about two boys hiding out in their homemade treehouse, earnestly conducting a topsecret experiment to waken a hibernating bee. What is their bigger mission? (John Williams, UK, 15 min.)Jellybaby Jack and Jill had a great relationship. Then they had a baby. Comparing his chronic crier to quieter kids, Jack is driven to comically desperate lengths to make life normal again. (Ronan & Rob Burke, Ireland, 10 min.)Small Boxes A young Hispanic-Australian lives with his family outside Sydney and works the night shift at a produce market. On an outing with his grandmother, he discovers an unexpected opportunity, and a buried hope is awakened. A compelling departure from the director of In Too Deep (SF05). (Rene Hernandez, Australia, 15 min.)Starry Night Beauty, desire, and heart connection are in the air as a lonely art historian (Miranda Richardson) prepares for her perfect evening: a date with troubled genius Vincent Van Gogh. (Ben Miller, UK, 13 min.)SUNDAY, APRIL 9Special PresentationWheeler Opera House, Aspen, 7:30 p.m.Director Spotlight: Jason Reitman and Thank You for Smoking (2 hrs.) This year’s Director Spotlight celebrates writer-director Jason Reitman, whose award-winning shorts have screened at festivals worldwide, including Shortsfest. Also a successful director of commercials, Jason has made the auspicious leap to feature film with this evening’s presentation. After screening his new work, Filmfest continues its conversation with Reitman (see Fridays schedule), in which hell talk about the transition to features and his affinity for comedy, as well as answer questions.In Thank You for Smoking, the tobacco industry’s foremost spokesperson, Nick Naylor is a master of doublespeak and a wiz of rhetorical manipulation. Viewers catch this stunningly proficient “yuppie Mephistopheles” in action at a pivotal point in his career where he is charming, virile, remorseless. They also get a glimpse of his all-too-human motivations. Then a set of complicating circumstances, including his son’s curiosity about his father’s ethics, throw Nick into a crisis of confidence only drastic measures can redress.The scathing satire boasts an ensemble cast that features Aaron Eckhart, Maria Bello, David Koechner, Katie Holmes, Robert Duvall, Rob Lowe and William H. Macy. In an age of overwhelming cynicism about corporate America and the disappearance of public discourse on critical issues, this hugely entertaining comedy poses tough questions about morality, hypocrisy, and the true meaning of personal freedom.


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Aspen and Snowmass Village make the Aspen Times’ work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.

For tax deductible donations, click here.
 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User


News


See more