Search for loose python in Glenwood comes up empty | AspenTimes.com

Search for loose python in Glenwood comes up empty

John Stroud
Glenwood Springs correspondent
Aspen, CO Colorado

GLENWOOD SPRINGS – Owners of a south Glenwood self-storage facility emptied several units Tuesday morning looking for what may have been an escaped pet python.

However, the snake which one of the Glenwood Self Storage Center unit renters said he found when he opened his unit, was no longer there when the city’s animal control officer arrived.

“We had a guy come in about 7 [a.m.] who said he opened his storage unit, and the snake was laying there on some boxes,” said Jim Hawkins, who owns the self-storage facility at 3410 S. Glen Ave. with his wife, Ingrid.

“He described it to the animal control officer, and she said it sounded like it could be a python,” Hawkins said. “We emptied three storage units looking for it, but there were no signs of it at all. So, I don’t know what we’ve got.”

Hawkins said the facility does not allow pets to be kept in storage units, and none of the tenants who were contacted owned up to keeping a python.

“We’ve never had anything like that happen here before,” he said. “With the economy the way it is, I suppose there are people who can’t afford to keep some of these exotic pets. We’re only 25 yards from the shopping center (Roaring Fork Marketplace), so it’s possible somebody could have let it loose and it migrated down to us.”

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It may not have been a python after all, Glenwood Springs Police Lt. Bill Kimminau said. The description of the 2-foot-long snake the man gave to Code Enforcement Officer Sarah Crawford also sounded a lot like a bull snake, which are common in this area, he said.

“We never did find the snake, so we’re not sure if it was a python or a bull snake,” Kimminau said. “If it is found and it is a python, we’ll take it to CARE (Colorado Animal Rescue) to be adopted out or try to find the owner.

“If it is a python and nobody finds it, I don’t imagine it would make it into the winter,” he said. “It’s not a serious threat to anything, except maybe some rodents.”

jstroud@postindependent.com

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