RodReady makes fishermen’s SUV dog-ready | AspenTimes.com

RodReady makes fishermen’s SUV dog-ready

Janet Urquhart

Janet Urquhart/The Aspen Times Weekly

RodReady, the “in-vehicle fishing rod transport system,” is a great idea, in theory.

In reality, it works, but not quite the way in which it was intended.Carrying a bunch of flyrods inside a vehicle is tricky. No one wants to disassemble a rod every time they take a drive with it, but the alternative – placing them across seat backs and such – always seems to result in lines that tangle in a manner that defies logic. Flies, still tied to the leaders, come loose and embed themselves in the upholstery, the dogs, the gear, whatever.RodReady promises safe transport of fishing rods (spinning or flyrods) out of the heat, wind, spray and weather.

Since I’ve never carried rods on the roof, weather has not been an issue. Rather, the challenge is safely stowing the rods inside the vehicle along with camping gear and canines, or backseat passengers.Made for SUVs, wagons and pickup trucks with a rear-bed mount, the RodReady holds an assortment of rods next to the ceiling of the vehicle and out of the way.But the system is not without its problems. It comes with two racks – front and rear – and the rear one is attached to our household’s SUV with suction cups affixed to the rear, side windows. The cups, however, occasionally unfix themselves from the windows and everything comes crashing down on whatever is below.

Inserting the rods from the back end also means threading them through the front rack. It’s sort of like a sobriety test. It’s not easy without going up front and negotiating the rod tips through the rack. Instead, we usually shove the rods over the top of the front rack instead of through it. This, in turn, generally renders useless the little clips that attach to the rearview mirror above the dash. The clips are supposed to hold the very tips of the rods, but our tips tend to be all over the place. The long ones wind up bent against the front windshield glass, while shorter rods tend to slip backward and rattle against the rear window.On the other hand, the thing does clear space for other gear and we have yet to hook a dog during transport.Janet Urquhart’s e-mail address is janet@aspentimes.com

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