Reflections from a familiar face | AspenTimes.com

Reflections from a familiar face

Dear Editor:

Sitting in solitude outside at the WC3 Cafe in Woody Creek enjoying the serenity of a beautiful sunny day, I do see more clearly now.

It’s great to be back in the Rockies. Yes, John, it makes me feel born again. I love the Rocky Mountains where everybody’s high and sometimes crazy enough to touch the sun.

I ran into the legendary Mary Hayes in front of Carl’s Pharmacy the day I arrived in town. Until that moment, I was beginning to think I am just a holographic image that won’t burn out and go home. No one really sees me. I feel transparent sometimes until someone acknowledges my presence by blessing me with a warm hug. She asked me that question everyone always asks, “Where you living?”

My answer is, may the poet of peace walk anywhere on earth (placing my hand on my heart), saying, this is my home.

I stopped by the Gonzo Museum to see what author D.J. Watkins is up to these days. The Tony Prikryl photo exhibit is well worth a visit. Seeing money in an artistic form is an interesting perspective. The $2 bill hanging on the wall at the Gonzo Museum caught my attention. Have you ever heard the saying, “He is odd as a $2 bill or queer as a $2 bill”?

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Isn’t it strange how innocent things get bad raps? I now have reversed my prejudice for the $2 bill. Looking closely at the bill hanging on the wall at the museum, I discovered it has the signing of the Declaration of Independence on the back of it, with Thomas Jefferson, who outlined our Declaration of Independence, on the front. I now find the face value more interesting than any other denomination.

“Put not your trust in money, but put your money in trust.” – Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr.

Hinton Harrison

Aspen