Preventive medicine is focus of symposium today at Harris Hall | AspenTimes.com

Preventive medicine is focus of symposium today at Harris Hall

Rachel Stockman
Special to The Aspen Times

Up to 600 people are scheduled to attend the Aspen Center for New Medicine’s second annual Prevention Symposium today.

The daylong event will bring together eight national experts to talk about the latest in preventive medicine. Harris Hall will be filled from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. as doctors and professionals in the health-care field discuss preventive health. Topics will range from nutrition to neuroscience as well as the importance of human spirituality.

“What’s interesting is that many of the doctors speaking are from different backgrounds and have never heard each other speak,” said Glenda Greenwald, founder of the Aspen Center for New Medicine.

She said while visiting the University of Colorado in July, Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson said that our health-care system “stinks” because we wait until people get sick and then spend a lot of money to help them. Thompson said a greater effort must be made to promote preventive medicine, thus solving the problem before it starts.

With only a small percentage of the government’s health-care efforts dedicated to prevention, Greenwald believes the symposium is a crucial step in highlighting the importance of preventive health.

“We are so fortunate to have the expertise of top physicians, researchers and spiritual and environmental thinkers available to the community,” she said. “We think prevention is the health-care medicine of the 21st century.”

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She also believes that Aspen is a great site because people will come from all over to visit and attend the symposium.

The opening session of the symposium Monday will entail a presentation by Michael Lerner, president of the Commonwealth Cancer Center in Bolinas, Calif. He will speak on “Personal and Planetary Healing in the 21st Century.”

Toxic chemicals, ozone depletion and the destruction of habitat are not only hazardous to the environment, said Lerner, but are also contributing to an array of human illness.

The cost of the symposium is $100, and all interested parties are invited to attend on a space-availability basis. Although the symposium is already sold out, tickets may be available at the door today. For more information, call 920-2957 or visit http://www.aspennewmed.org.

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