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Pitkin County sheriff’s investigator sues over injuries from burglary call

A Pitkin County sheriff’s investigator has taken a Red Mountain homeowner and other defendants to court over serious injuries he suffered while responding to a burglary call.

Brad Gibson’s lawsuit claims that on Sept. 5, 2013, he was dispatched to a home at 386 Ridge Road after its alarms ignited, and stepped on several nails protruding from a plywood mat at the home, which was undergoing construction work. It was dark at the time, and Gibson wasn’t using a flashlight because he didn’t want to make his presence known to the potential burglar. The call was a false alarm, however.

Gibson drove to Aspen Valley Hospital where he was treated for several puncture wounds on the bottom of both of his feet, the suit says. Some of the wounds were severe, the suit says.



Gibson, who declined to comment, has been on crutches periodically since the incident, often limping as well.

His attorney, Gary Doehling of Snowmass Village, said Gibson had to take time off from work and was on limited duty for a period of time.



“He just recently was put back on full duty,” Doehling said. “He had a lot of complications and still has a lot of complications.”

Citing personnel reasons, Undersheriff Ron Ryan declined to provide specifics on how much time Gibson missed from work. Gibson was provided worker’s compensation for the injuries, Ryan said.

Doehling said the suit was filed to beat the two-year statute of limitations on the lawsuit’s claims — premises liability, negligence and outrageous conduct.

“He’s still being treated and his medical situation remains unresolved,” Doehling said.

Defendants in the suit include Memphis, Tennessee, resident Philip R. Zanone, who owns the home and could not be reached for immediate comment.

Property manager Franchon Bliss Jacobson also was named in the suit as well as Garvik Construction, the general contractor on the home’s construction project.

rcarroll@aspentimes.com


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Pitkin County sheriff’s investigator sues over injuries from burglary call

A Pitkin County sheriff’s investigator has taken a Red Mountain homeowner and other defendants to court over serious injuries he suffered while responding to a burglary call.

Brad Gibson’s lawsuit claims that on Sept. 5, 2013, he was dispatched to a home at 386 Ridge Road after its alarms ignited, and stepped on several nails protruding from a plywood mat at the home, which was undergoing construction work. It was dark at the time, and Gibson wasn’t using a flashlight because he didn’t want to make his presence known to the potential burglar. The call was a false alarm, however.

Gibson drove to Aspen Valley Hospital where he was treated for several puncture wounds on the bottom of both of his feet, the suit says. Some of the wounds were severe, the suit says.





Gibson, who declined to comment, has been on crutches periodically since the incident, often limping as well.

His attorney, Gary Doehling of Snowmass Village, said Gibson had to take time off from work and was on limited duty for a period of time.





“He just recently was put back on full duty,” Doehling said. “He had a lot of complications and still has a lot of complications.”

Citing personnel reasons, Undersheriff Ron Ryan declined to provide specifics on how much time Gibson missed from work. Gibson was provided worker’s compensation for the injuries, Ryan said.

Doehling said the suit was filed to beat the two-year statute of limitations on the lawsuit’s claims — premises liability, negligence and outrageous conduct.

“He’s still being treated and his medical situation remains unresolved,” Doehling said.

Defendants in the suit include Memphis, Tennessee, resident Philip R. Zanone, who owns the home and could not be reached for immediate comment.

Property manager Franchon Bliss Jacobson also was named in the suit as well as Garvik Construction, the general contractor on the home’s construction project.

rcarroll@aspentimes.com


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Aspen and Snowmass Village make the Aspen Times’ work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.

For tax deductible donations, click here.
 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User


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