Pitkin County assumes control of High Valley Farms odor monitoring | AspenTimes.com

Pitkin County assumes control of High Valley Farms odor monitoring

The Pitkin County Environmental Health Department has assumed control of the High Valley Farm marijuana growing operation's third party odor monitoring program. In an agreement reached with Pitkin County Commissioners in September, High Valley Farms is paying the county for a third party that will actually conduct the odor monitoring. Should any odors be detected, the monitor will contact High Valley Farm to gain access to the property and check the building to verify whether odors are indeed coming from the facility. Pitkin County Environmental Health Manager Kurt Dahl will be immediately notified by text and email whenever a complaint is lodged.

"I am optimistic that this effort will help to alleviate the concerns of the public that proper odor monitoring is occurring at High Valley Farm. Our role will be to validate that the carbon filters at the greenhouses are working," Dahl said.

Odor monitoring, which has been in effect since mid-September, resulted from neighbor complaints of 'skunk-like pot smells' emanating from the large-scale growing facility. All greenhouses at High Valley Farm have reportedly been fitted with carbon filtering systems that remove odors.

High Valley Farm officials say marijuana plants are currently being moved back into the greenhouses and are being distributed more evenly so that carbon filters in each of the facilities have more even loads. Officials say all greenhouses will be full to capacity and plants properly distributed by early December.

High Valley Farms is required to meet with commissioners on a quarterly basis until they no longer deem it necessary.

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