On the Run: The Tenakee Training Regimen | AspenTimes.com

On the Run: The Tenakee Training Regimen

Joel Stonington

I’m taking care of a 6-year-old husky named Tenakee. He’s sort of a bad boy. When he doesn’t want to do something he goes deaf, and he gets a bit talkative when he really wants his ears scratched. He’s a smart puppy. I like him.So I’ve been taking him running. As a big dog, he really needs to get out as much as possible. A 10-mile hike would maybe tire him out for about half a day. So I run with him as fast as I can in order to get him good and tired, which rarely happens.Lately, I’ve been thinking that I might be getting more out of the running sessions than he does because really, it’s me keeping up with him. What I’ve realized is that he might be the best training partner I could have. Here’s the deal. I wake up between 6 and 7 in the a.m. This is to his credit. If I didn’t have to tire him out I would still be in bed snoozing. He runs around the house howling and stretching out. I put on the collar and leash, and off we go. It’s pretty much guaranteed that he’ll go out too fast. I’m OK with that because it gives me an advantage later. He’s like that 15-year-old who sprints out at the start of a 10-miler and finds zero energy around a mile and a half. I start out at Tenakee’s trot speed. Until about a week ago, I couldn’t keep up with him if he knocked it up to a doggy canter, but all that has changed. So after about 10 minutes, I kick into his canter pace. It’s still not a gallop – he could still kick my butt whenever he wanted to – but moving up to cantor pace is a significant achievement. Anyway, I’ve submitted the idea to the patent office. It’s going to be called the Tenakee Training Regimen, and I’m convinced it’s going to sweep the nation.Just like tae bo.

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