No longer needed in roundabout, Glenwood Springs’ wooden buffalo herd put out to pasture | AspenTimes.com
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No longer needed in roundabout, Glenwood Springs’ wooden buffalo herd put out to pasture

Matthew Bennett
Glenwood Springs Post Independent
The wooden herd needs a new home to roam.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

The city of Glenwood Springs has put its “buffalo herd” up for auction.

Constructed from recycled wooden pallets by local artists Krzysztof and Noemi Kosmowski, the buffalo herd served as a temporary art installation for the Sixth Street roundabout area.

The city’s arts and culture board had hoped to activate the space with pallet art until city council approved permanent plans for the area some refer to as the entrance to Glenwood.

At their Sept. 5 meeting, councilors agreed to spend approximately $689,000 on the Sixth and Laurel Roundabout Landscaping project, which Gould Construction broke ground on recently.

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Now no longer in need of the temporary art installation, the city has placed the nine wooden buffalo pieces up for auction, individually with a minimum asking bid of $500, online at http://www.publicsurplus.com

“The amount was decided on between city officials and the arts and culture board,” Parks and Recreation Administrator Karstin Moser said.

No bids were placed as of Monday evening.

The herd currently resides in front of the Glenwood Center for the Arts on East Sixth Street.

According to a news release, the wooden buffalo range in size from 5 to 7 feet tall and 5 feet wide.

Additionally, all proceeds from the auction will go toward funding public art projects in the city.

“We want to put all of the proceeds back into art,” Moser said.

Interested parties have until 4 p.m. Oct. 30 to bid on any of the wooden buffalo pieces.

mabennett@postindependent.com


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