News in Brief | AspenTimes.com

News in Brief

Aspen Times staff report
Aspen, CO Colorado

ASPEN – Clark’s Market will open its new pharmacy inside its Aspen store on Wednesday, company president Tom Clark Jr. said.

The 500-square-foot pharmacy will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays. It will be closed Sundays. Located inside Clark’s Market at 300 Puppy Smith, the pharmacy will be accepting over 300 insurance plans, including Aetna, Caremark, Express Scripts and Humana.

Clark said the pharmacy project started in August. When the project was announced last year, the targeted opening was sometime in mid-December. Clark said the federal license came through last month, but it took extra time to line up all of the insurance companies.

“We’re finally there,” he said Monday. “The truck will come Tuesday to deliver all of the stock.”

Joe Kistner, who has been a pharmacist in the Roaring Fork Valley, will be the pharmacy manager. In all, the store is hiring two pharmacists and four pharmacy techs, Clark said.

Clark’s Pharmacy gives Aspen residents a new option for getting prescriptions filled, since the only drugstore serving the city since September 2009 – the month that Rodney’s Clinic Pharmacy closed after 14 years in business – has been Carl’s Pharmacy on East Main Street.

Outside of regular business hours, the pharmacy will be able to take requests for prescription refills through an automated phone system, as long as callers have the prescription number. The phone number for the pharmacy is 925-2728. Pharmacists can be reached by e-mail as well: aspen_pharmacy@clarksmarket.com.

BASALT – Local residents tend to look like a fit bunch, but looks can be deceiving.

For a peek at what doesn’t show up in the mirror, or even on the scale, After-Hours Medical Care in Basalt will host a heart health screening on Friday from 8:30-10:30 a.m., offering an assessment to help participants determine their risk for a heart attack in the next 10 years.

It could be $15 well spent, according to Dr. Gordon Gerson, Aspen cardiologist.

More than 400,000 Americans die of a heart attack annually before they reach a hospital.

“For a lot of them, it will be their first symptom,” Gerson said.

Active denizens of mountain communities, though they tend to engage in plenty of outdoor activities, are not immune, he said.

“I think that sometimes, people feel if they eat properly and exercise, that’s probably all they need to do,” Gerson said. Genetics, however, play a significant role, and even individuals whose cholesterol levels are below the trigger point for intervention typically have higher levels than they should, he said.

Friday’s screening includes a blood test for lipids (cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and direct LDL), blood sugar and liver function.

Individuals who take cholesterol-lowering medication need to have their liver function checked periodically, and blood sugar levels are an indicator of diabetes or a pre-diabetic condition, which is linked to heart disease, according to Ginny Dyche, director of community relations at Aspen Valley Hospital.

The screening also includes a blood pressure check and body mass index calculation. A “risk profile” questionnaire will be offered.

The screening is $15, payable by cash or check; no credit or bank cards are accepted.

The blood test requires fasting for 12 hours with the exception of water.

After-Hours Medical Care, 234 Cody Lane, is operated by Aspen Valley Hospital.

Participants in the screening should follow up with their physician regarding the results of the testing, the hospital advised.

For more information, call 544-1296.


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