News in Brief | AspenTimes.com

News in Brief

When a piece of city property at the Aspen Business Center is no longer going to the dogs (and cats), it may go to city employees.

The city is currently advertising for proposals to develop affordable housing at the site of the Aspen-Pitkin County Animal Shelter, which will be vacated by its current tenants once construction of a new shelter farther out of town is finished in late summer or early fall.

The plan is to raze the old shelter building and construct sale housing for city workers, according to Ed Sadler, assistant city manager. The city of Aspen owns the small parcel near the back side of the ABC.

“We think we’d like to do up to 12 units. We’re not sure if it will fit,” Sadler said. “We’re interested in what we can get to fit on it.”

It’s possible the city can squeeze a three-story building on the parcel, he said.

Aspen is also planning three employee units on property it owns off Puppy Smith Street and has 22 units for city workers at Water Place, as well as a few rental units at Truscott Place and a few other residences scattered about.

Much of the city’s housing is sold to employees who must sell it back to the city when they leave the government’s employ.

BOISE, Idaho (AP) ” A rancher in remote central Idaho shot a wolf he said was harassing his cattle ” the first time one of the federally protected predators has been killed under new guidelines that took effect Feb. 2.

The rancher shot the female gray wolf on private property late Sunday. He watched it and another larger wolf chasing his cattle, the rancher told officials. The other wolf escaped.

Under the new rule that affects Idaho and Montana, people can shoot wolves that pursue their livestock. Before, ranchers had to wait until a wolf had actually bitten one of their animals.

The new rule marked a first step in returning control of wolf populations to states and private landowners, who say they need it to limit predatory attacks on livestock, domestic animals and wild game herds as wolf numbers steadily rise.

Federal officials have already determined the rancher acted appropriately. They say he called Thursday to report that wolves caused his herd of cattle to stampede, killing one calf. The rancher wanted to know his rights under the new rule.

Wolf advocacy groups are reserving judgment pending an investigation.

This is the third wolf killed legally in Idaho this year; the previous two were killed by officers from the federal Wildlife Services.

Colorado Mountain College is down to one city, but two choices in its search for a new western Garfield County campus.

The CMC board of trustees decided Monday to build a new campus at one of two locations in Rifle, ruling out Silt.

The two new contenders are the Snyder site, behind the Grand River Medical Center off Airport Road and offered by Silt’s Jean and Jim Snyder, and the Howard site, 13 acres on Airport Road east of Rifle, donated by Bob Howard.

“I think the Snyder site is the best location but not necessarily the best site,” said trustee Robert Dick.

The Snyder location is better because of its proximity to commuter student amenities, such as food and gas, Dick said, but the site may present other problems. The site lies in an alluvial fan, which can present soil challenges, and it’s within a 100-year flood plane.

The Howard site is free from those challenges, but is outside Rifle’s core area and is zoned for light industrial use, which would mean fewer student amenities.

CMC is replacing its Railroad Avenue location in Rifle because of increases in student population and the age of the building.


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