News in Brief | AspenTimes.com

News in Brief

Beginning this weekend, your Sunday edition of The Aspen Times will no longer include a copy of the magazine-style Aspen Times Weekly.

The Times Weekly still will be available for free in the green newspaper boxes throughout the valley.

To explain, we originally inserted the Weekly into the Sunday paper to increase exposure for the Weekly. We redesigned the publication in early 2005, and wanted everyone to see it. Since then, the new Times Weekly has become hugely successful ” so much so that it hardly fits into the Sunday newspaper.

In fact, the Times Weekly must be inserted into the Sunday paper by hand, a time-consuming process that has delayed the delivery of both papers.

Furthermore, when we insert one publication into the other, we cannot squeeze as many of them into our racks. The racks run out, and readers cannot get their paper.

By making this change, we should have both the Sunday daily and the Times Weekly available to readers by 7 a.m every Sunday. And there should be enough copies of both publications for everyone.

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We will continue to home-deliver both the Sunday daily and the Times Weekly. If you would like the paper delivered to your home, please call 925-3414.

Former Summit Schools Superintendent Lynn Spampinato, whose brief time in Summit County in 2004 was stormy, to say the least, had a rough start this week in front of the Virgin Islands Legislature, where she is serving as the acting education commissioner, according to the Virgin Islands Daily News.

The Virgin Islands Senate Committee on Rules and Judiciary voted to forward Spampinato’s nomination with an unfavorable recommendation to the full Senate for a vote next week, this week’s article said.

Spampinato declined to comment on the hearing’s outcome as she left the chambers, the Daily News reported. The Virgin Islands article quoted her as saying that the public education system is in crisis across the United States, and the Virgin Islands has the opportunity to become a model of reform; the Virgin Islands governor announced Aug. 14 that Spampinato would be the one to improve the area’s under-performing schools.

In Summit in 2004, Summit’s teachers’ union voted “no confidence” in Spampinato, the school board president resigned, and the board terminated Spampinato’s contract, with both parties citing a bad fit. Spampinato left town with a $211,000 severance.