News in Brief | AspenTimes.com

News in Brief

About 200 wanted posters and some citizen assistance aided in the arrest of a man wanted by Vail authorities Friday afternoon, police said.Alejandro Bolona, 36, was working as a housekeeper at a Vail hotel when he illegally entered one or more guest rooms and took checks, according to Vail Police Detective Ryan Millbern. Bolona was later caught on tape cashing checks at a bank in Glenwood Springs, after which he never returned to his job in Vail, Milbern said. Vail Police later learned that Bolona was attempting to obtain employment at a hotel in Jackson Hole, Wyo., Millbern said, at which point Vail police issued a warrant for his arrest on felony charges of theft and burglary.Millbern said he printed a number of wanted posters featuring a photo and personal information on Bolona and sent them to hotels and motels in the Jackson Hole area.”A gentleman saw the picture and realized that [Bolona] was a bunkmate at a local homeless shelter” in Jackson Hole, Millbern said. The man then notified police.The same tipster was reportedly walking down a street later and saw Bolona, Millbern said. The tipster called the police again, who responded and arrested Bolona, Millbern said.Bolona also is suspected of similar crimes elsewhere in Eagle County and in Aspen, Millbern said. Authorities in those areas are expected to add charges of their own now that Bolona is in custody. (Vail Daily)

The Department of the Interior has issued research, development and demonstration (RD&D) leases for five oil shale projects on public lands in Colorado’s Piceance Basin, managed by the Bureau of Land Management.These are the first-ever RD&D leases issued for public lands, and the first federal oil shale leases issued in more than 30 years.C. Stephen Allred, Assistant Secretary of the Interior for land and minerals management, signed the leases for projects proposed by Chevron USA, EGL Resources, Inc., and Shell Frontier Oil & Gas, Inc.”These oil shale RD&D leases will help us determine how industry might develop this tremendous resource effectively and economically,” he said. “But important issues remain to be addressed, including how to ensure appropriate environmental protections are achieved. We’ll be working closely with local communities and others on answers as we move forward.”RD&D leases grant rights to develop oil shale on tracts not greater than 160 acres of public land. These tracts were identified in proposals submitted by the companies in June 2005. The initial term of the leases is 10 years, and the companies have the option of extending the leases up to five years if they can prove they are making progress toward producing oil at a commercial level. The leases also indicate the lessee has the right to convert the acreage plus adjacent land up to 4,960 acres to a 20-year commercial lease once commercial production levels have been achieved and all other requirements have been met.As outlined in the environmental assessments and decision records signed by Allred last month, the RD&D leases include a number of project-specific requirements for permitting, monitoring and mitigation to reduce possible impacts to the environment.The Green River Formation, covering portions of Colorado, Utah and Wyoming, may hold the equivalent of 800 billion barrels of shale oil that is potentially recoverable. More than 70 percent of the formation, including the richest and thickest oil shale deposits, lies under federally managed lands, giving the Interior Department a key role in determining how the resource is developed. (Glenwood Springs Post Independent)