News in Brief | AspenTimes.com

News in Brief

A man suspected of trying to aid accused cop shooter Steven Appl could face up to a decade in prison and a co-defendant could be sentenced to a far longer term if the two are convicted.Wayne Hangs and Nichole Brownell were advised in court Wednesday of the charges filed against them and potential penalties.Magistrate Lain Leoniak also set arraignment dates of Jan. 4 for the two.Hangs, who lives south of Silt, faces two counts of being an accessory to a crime, and a tampering with evidence charge. The presumptive maximum sentences for the charges would add up to 1012 years in prison.Brownell also faces the accessory and tampering charges, along with other counts including a felony charge of possession of marijuana with intent to distribute.The felony charges carry presumptive maximum sentences totaling 1612 years. However, Brownell’s attorney, Peter Rachesky, said any sentences she might receive if convicted could be doubled because she was free on bond at the time she was charged.Brownell was due to be sentenced this month after pleading guilty to methamphetamine-related charges in Rifle. But the sentencing was delayed after she was charged in the Appl case. She also had been arrested and released on $10,000 bond for a felony drug charge in Mesa County.

Why does Eagle County Commissioner Arn Menconi vote on Vail Resorts-related issues? Because the county’s attorneys say he can.Opponents accused Menconi of a conflict of interest at a Nov. 21 county hearing about a proposed alpine slide at Beaver Creek. At that meeting, Rick Johnson, an attorney for the Beaver Creek Property Owners Association, and William Stone, who owns a home in Beaver Creek, both said Menconi shouldn’t have been voting on the slide issue. The problem, they said, is Menconi’s relationship to Vail Resorts through the Snowboard Outreach Society, a nonprofit group that receives a big share of its annual donations through the resort company. The group teaches at-risk kids to snowboard.Johnson also asked Menconi if he had met with Vail Resorts Chief Executive Officer Rob Katz before the Nov. 21 meeting. But at the meeting, assistant county attorney Bob Morris told Menconi not to answer questions about either his relationship with the resort company or a meeting with Katz.County attorneys have told Menconi he can vote on matters Vail Resorts brings to the commissioners.

The inflatable Vail Ice Dome – which lasted four seasons – survived a lawsuit from its neighbors but ultimately fell victim to the bottom line.Its new owner, the city of Cranston, R.I., is hoping the once controversial “Bubble” won’t meet the same troubles on the East Coast.”In fact, we’ve had just the opposite – clamoring and frustration that it took as long as it did,” said Robin Schutt, deputy director of administration for Cranston.Cranston bought the inflatable white bubble for $225,000 from the town of Vail. Cranston officials say the ice rink under the bubble could pay for itself within two years.”There’s a huge need for ice time in Rhode Island,” Schutt said. “It’s a huge hockey community.”Vail inflated the dome at the golf course each winter for four years. The town purchased the dome in 2000 for $770,000 to provide more ice time for local skating groups.The 27,000-square-foot fabric dome uses a refrigeration system to freeze the ice and fans to keep the dome inflated.In 2004, the town and the rec district agreed to stop operating the dome. Local hockey players and parents opposed that decision.The Aspen Times, Aspen, Colo.