News in Brief | AspenTimes.com

News in Brief

Pitkin County is creating a passing lane to ease traffic on Brush Creek Road. Construction of the new lane should be complete in September.

The 1,400-foot lane for slow-moving vehicles to pull off and let others pass will extend upvalley from Pioneer Springs, said Brian Pettet, Pitkin County Public Works director. The hope is that construction vehicles will pull off to keep traffic moving.

There will be no requirement for vehicles to pull over, but signs will encourage construction trucks and other slow vehicles to move aside.

Construction of the lane will cease during peak rush-hour traffic; crews might also work at night to help finish the project on time, Pettet said.

Authorities on Monday were still without a suspect or motive in a string of incidents early Sunday morning that included a torched trailer home and a stolen pickup truck later set ablaze.

“We don’t know where the suspect went,” Garfield County Sheriff’s Detective Don Breier said. “We don’t have anybody that we’re looking at as a suspect, and we don’t have any known motive.”

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No injuries were reported Sunday, though Garfield County Sheriff Lou Vallario said some pets may have died in the trailer fire.

The Colorado Bureau of Investigations has joined local authorities in the investigation.

The trailer was set on fire early Sunday. The family ” Jose Castillo and Guadalupe Garcia and their children ” was out of town.

About 15 minutes later, a witness reported a pickup truck speeding down Main Street that lost control on the rain-dampened road and slammed into the side of a restaurant, authorities said. The truck sped off, but it was found before dawn in nearby Redstone, fully engulfed in flames.

Trailer park owner Bob Olenick said the residents of the destroyed home were longtime residents and good tenants. (Glenwood Springs Post-Independent)

The Aspen City Council showed strong support Monday night for a proposal to subdivide a property at 1001 Ute Ave.

The subdivision would include two free-market residential units, each more than 5,000 square feet, but the council liked the addition of a three-bedroom Category 4 affordable housing unit and an open-space parcel that would be deeded to the city.

Councilman Jack Johnson said his main concern was avalanche and debris safety; developers are proposing a 14-foot retaining wall. Johnson requested a site visit.

The council continued its discussion until July 24.

Vail voters will decide today whether Solaris will be built, 23 months after the controversial project was first submitted to the town.

The proposal for the redevelopment of the Crossroads site in Vail Village includes 69 condos, a three-screen movie theater, a 10-lane bowling alley, a town-controlled public plaza/ice rink, stores and restaurants. Supporters say the project brings amenities and improvements that will breathe life back into aging Vail Village. Opponents say the project is too tall, too bulky, is out of line with long-range planning for Vail and hurts the resort’s ambiance.

The developer, Peter Knobel, has also promised $4 million for street improvements and $1.1 million for public art. Other promises from the developer are public bathrooms, 12 employee housing units, a loading dock accessible for area businesses and a private pocket park for the neighboring Vail Village Inn. The developer also says the new building would increase town sales tax revenue from Crossroads from $179,000 to $1.4 million annually.

The building would be 99.9 feet tall, according to the town’s official measurement. Its tallest point would be 87.6 feet higher than the frontage road and 111 feet higher than its plaza. (Vail Daily)

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