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News in Brief

Crystal River Marketplace plans ready for viewingCarbondale area residents can review conceptual site-plan sketches for the Crystal River Marketplace property on Highway 133 tonight at Town Hall.The sketches are the result of two years of community meetings, economic studies and “site-plan teamwork,” according to a statement from town officials.The sketches came out of a two-day “design charrette” last week, including input from the developers, a citizen task force and the town.The special review session will take place from 6-8 p.m. today. The next opportunity for citizen input and review will be at a Community Open House, featuring completed drawings and economic information, from 6-9 p.m. July 5.After the review sessions, the Carbondale Board of Trustees and the Planning and Zoning Commission will hold a joint session for formal presentation of development plans at 6:30 p.m. July 19.Skinner scores top job at KDNKKDNK-Carbondale Community Radio has named Roaring Fork Valley media veteran Steve Skinner its new general manager.Skinner, who is entering his second shot at management duties at the station, has been interim manager since March; his duties will now include programming and station administration.Skinner has what the station termed a “storied history in valley media,” including a recent stint as program manager for KAJX-Aspen Public Radio. He also has served as a morning-show host for KSPN-FM, a commercial station; was general manager at KDNK in the 1980s; and has worked in various capacities at both The Aspen Times and the Aspen Daily News.He will continue writing a column for the Daily News, according to an announcement by KDNK.KDNK is a 1,000-member station featuring an eclectic mix of music broadcast by volunteer DJs, as well as locally produced public affairs shows and nationally syndicated news programming. It can be heard downvalley at 88.1-FM, in Basalt at 88.5-FM, in Aspen at 88.3-FM, and worldwide at http://www.kdnk.org.Summit School District defends Bible distributionIn the face of criticism about distribution of free Bibles in the middle and high schools, the Summit School District recently issued a statement to clarify its position – and said it was open for change.On May 11, the district gave permission for Gideons International, a men’s Christian group, to set up tables inside the two Summit County schools and offer free copies of the New Testament to students as they walked by. According to the Gideons, approximately 330 volumes were distributed in the middle school, and 130 in the high school.Parents had not been informed in advance of the Bible giveaway, and several showed up at the May 24 Board of Education meeting to express their feelings about the board’s decision.”I’m personally uncomfortable with distribution of Bibles on school grounds,” mother Heidi Dickstein told the board. “I question whether a group of Islamicists would have been granted similar access.”In its statement, the school district explained that if other groups such as college recruiters and the Rotary Club are allowed to distribute brochures and dictionaries inside the schools, no legal grounds exist to prohibit Bible giveaways. Under the district’s official policy, the only types of materials deemed unacceptable for distribution are those that espouse hate, promote violence, have a commercial intent, are libelous, promote a political position or are obscene by community standards.School superintendent Millie Hamner said the policy recognizes that community groups may have information that may be useful or beneficial to students, even if the district or the individual school does not endorse the information.”Our district could prohibit the distribution of any and all materials by outside groups, but we have chosen to open our schools to our community,” she said.At the same time, Hamner said the district would consider a reversal in the policy, with enough community feedback. (Summit Daily News)


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