News in brief | AspenTimes.com

News in brief

Aspen Times writer

Road work Crews will be striping pavementNew stripes will be painted on local roads Monday; motorists are asked to drive with caution near the work crews and be aware of wet paint.Maroon Creek Road, Owl Creek Road, Magnifico Way and Red Mountain Drive will get fresh stripes. The work was originally scheduled to be done Sept. 6 but was delayed. Inclement weather on Monday could alter the plan again.Call the Pitkin County Public Works Department at 920-5390 for more information.AspenWanted: Bartenders to create new cocktailLocal bartenders who wish to stir up some friendly competition in the Aspen Chamber Resort Association’s 4th Annual Cocktail Classic must register for the event by 5 p.m. Friday.The Cocktail Classic showcases Aspen’s cocktail experts as they compete to crown Aspen’s official drink for the 2005-06 season. Registration is free and bartenders must be from an established food and beverage business in Aspen. The event is on Thursday, Sept. 29, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. in the SKY Hotel and 39 Degrees bar. The winning bartender receives bragging rights, $500 cash and more. To register or for more information please call 920-7146.ColoradoPro-wolf group wants them reintroducedDENVER (AP) – The state should develop a plan to reintroduce wolves or it will be a century before they roam in Colorado again, wolf advocates say.They say a plan similar to the one created to restore the Canada lynx population, which has been successful, should be launched.So far the state’s Wolf Management Working Group – made up of ranchers, environmentalists, sportsmen, biologists and government officials – has agreed that wolves should be tolerated if they wander in from adjacent states, if they do not harm livestock or cause other problems.Rob Edward of Sinapu, a Boulder-based group that advocates reintroduction of wolves, and a member of the state working group, said the panel is an ideal forum for developing a wolf reintroduction plan.”It’s fairly obvious there won’t be any viable, self-sustaining packs in Colorado for the next 100 years if we wait for them to wander in,” he said. “Throughout our group discussions, we have been asking the state for a recovery plan that should include reintroductions, but most of the working group rebuked us and now it’s time the state faces up to the wishes of the people.”Mountain statesEconomy strong but decline expectedDENVER (AP) – The economy in the mountain region of Wyoming, Colorado and Utah remained strong in August, but growth is expected to slow because of increased oil prices and the effects of Hurricane Katrina.Rising natural gas prices and higher short-term interest rates will impede growth as early as the fourth quarter, said Ernie Goss, a Creighton economics professor who directs the Omaha, Neb.-based Creighton University Economic Forecasting Group.”The tragedy in New Orleans and the U.S. Gulf Coast will certainly contribute to higher prices in the months ahead,” Goss said. “However, the massive rebuilding, once it begins, will positively affect U.S. GDP growth.”The group’s overall Mountain States Index declined to 71.2 in August from 72.4 in July.The Creighton Economist Forecasting Group conducts a monthly survey of supply managers in the three states to compile the index, which ranges between 0 and 100. An index greater than 50 indicates an expansionary economy over the next three to six months.