New shop proves prevalence of motorheads in Aspen | AspenTimes.com

New shop proves prevalence of motorheads in Aspen

Amanda Charles
Special to the Aspen Times Weekly
Aspen, CO Colorado

Janet Urquhart The Aspen Times

ASPEN – In town sits a building on Aspen’s Mill Street that houses full-service bike shops on each side. The north side entertains a collection of wheels from Ibis, Pivot and Santa Cruz, while the south side entertains a collection of wheels from Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha.

What separates the sides?

A motor, of course.

On June 1 of this year, Alex Dicharry of Golden brought more than 20 years of race engineering to town with Aspen Motorworx, a motorbike service and consignment shop in the space behind the popular bicycle rental shop, Aspen Velo.

After weeks of clearing out the garage previously home to snowcats and plows, today Aspen Motorworx sparkles with bright and shiny things, supporting more than 200 clients from Colorado to Texas and beyond with complete in-house service of dirt bikes, motorcycles – and even mopeds.

“Our clientele ranges from the beginner who knows little about the sport, to the serious rider who brings a bike in five times just to get the suspension just right and to the high-end rider who brings the bike in simply for a wash,” Dicharry said.

Recommended Stories For You

Recognizing the demand for motorbike service in Aspen, Dicharry feels his shop is a good fit. “The accessibility of this particular area attracts riders from all over, and at the same time the terrain is harder on the bikes than anywhere else,” he noted.

“It’s always a surprise to see what people break up on the trails,” he said. “Sometimes we find ourselves selling parts off our own bikes just so we can fix someone else’s.”

When it comes to dirt bike riding, Dicharry is a die-hard fan. “The difference between dirt biking and mountain biking is you can get out so much further in a shorter amount of time,” he said. “Some of the points we access are incomparable to the points accessed by mountain bikers and even hikers.”

On the other hand, just because these riders have a motor underneath them doesn’t mean the sport isn’t equally as challenging as mountain biking or hiking. According to Dicharry, in an average 80- to 110-mile day on a dirt bike, the exhaustion level is the same as a 30-mile ride on a mountain bike.

But whether hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding or dirt bike riding, Dicharry supports a respect for all users and claims the general public to be pretty open minded when it comes to trail use.

“Most of the places we ride are farther out than the popular hiking and biking trails,” he said. “And for me personally, I have yet to run into any kind of conflict with other users.”