Molson Coors closing Denver office, cutting 500 jobs and moving headquarters to Chicago | AspenTimes.com
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Molson Coors closing Denver office, cutting 500 jobs and moving headquarters to Chicago

Josie Sexton
The Denver Post

In a landmark moment in Colorado beer history, Molson Coors announced on Wednesday that it will move its North American headquarters from Denver to Chicago and cut up to 500 jobs across its international offices.

The beer giant currently employs 2,300 people in Colorado, according to Molson Coors. Around 300 of those employees work in the Denver office, and “a lot of those people will be offered jobs and relocation packages to remain with the company and their teams,” Matt Hargarten, Molson Coors’ senior director of corporate communications, told The Denver Post on Wednesday.

He couldn’t estimate how many of the 400-500 cut positions would be from the company’s Denver offices, but he said the city would take the biggest hit of all those affected. The changes will be made by the end of 2019.

The company will continue to operate its Coors distribution wing in Colorado, however, as well as its Blue Moon Brewing facility in Denver’s River North, smaller brand divisions like AC Golden Brewing and, of course, the 146-year-old, Golden-based Coors Brewery, one of the oldest companies in Colorado.

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