Losing the views | AspenTimes.com

Losing the views

Dear Editor:I must admit I was rather pleased to read recently elected Aspen City Council member J.E. DeVilbiss’ comment “When we raised the height limit from 28 feet to 42 feet, I’m not sure people envisioned that would mean 50 feet.” Where was this very smart man when the first of many “over-the-height-limit” lodge, hotel and timeshares were approved? When the Infill Plan of increasing density and raising building heights was scrapped by a previous council, many people thought the City Council would stick to the zoning on the books (28 feet) and keep the building heights, which allowed the views of the mountains to loom over Aspen. Then along come amendments to the zoning code, which, without full public notice disclosure of what those amendments actually meant, was approved by a former council and two current members of council. Those approvals transformed the breathtaking mountain views of Independence Pass, Aspen Mountain and Shadow Mountain, which Aspen has always been famous for, into a virtual wall of cement. For me, it is particularly disheartening to say, “It really doesn’t make a difference if a new project like Lift 1A wants to add a few more feet like 99.9 percent of the other developers have.”You can’t see the proposed Lift 1A redevelopment from town anyway. So what difference does it make if they are a couple of feet over the height limit? It’s time to rock on, get these redevelopments built, and, for council to focus on getting our residents and guests out of current traffic jams on Durant Street, Mill Street, Bleeker Street, Main Street, the roundabout and the wormhole at Big Burlingame and Buttermilk entrances. Not to mention the schools, the post office, Truscott/golf course Highway 82 entrance, Brush Creek Road and Owl Creek. And … oh, the airport. Toni KronbergAspen

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