ANB Bank to appeal project denial in Glenwood | AspenTimes.com
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ANB Bank to appeal project denial in Glenwood

Matthew Bennett
Glenwood Springs Post Independent
Pedestrians pass in front of the existing building in the 900 block of Grand Avenue, where new property owner ANB Bank had plans for a new bank building.
John Stroud / Post Independent

In July, the Glenwood Springs Planning and Zoning Commission unanimously denied ANB Bank’s proposal to construct a two-story bank/office building in the city’s downtown core.

On Thursday, ANB Bank will appeal that decision at Glenwood City Council’s regularly scheduled meeting, which begins at 6:15 p.m. in council chambers located in city hall.

ANB Bank has 32 locations across Colorado, Kansas and Wyoming including one in Glenwood Springs for nearly 30 years.

Currently located at 2624 Grand Ave., ANB Bank plans to relocate from south Glenwood to downtown.

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“It’s a pretty inaccessible location. It’s tough for our clients to get down here from downtown and other places and it’s tough for our employees to interact with surrounding businesses,” said Chad Lee Balcomb & Green partner who has assisted ANB Bank with its appeal process.

ANB Bank has already purchased the property at 910 Grand Ave. but will need council’s approval before constructing its new facility.

Two 1915-circa buildings reside on the property ANB bought between the White River National Forest headquarters and Vicki Lee Green Realtors.

Those WWI-era buildings — which ANB Bank plans to demolish to make room for its proposed 9,428 square foot building — house seven small businesses including: KC’s Wing House, Tesseract Comics & Games, Jewels & Gems, Bellini’s Fashion, CPA Services Pro, Inc., Glenwood Spa N Nails and Glenwood Escape Room.

According to Community Bank President Randy Diers, ANB has offered assistance to all seven businesses being displaced.

“The package we’ve put forth to help them in a time of transition (is) 12 months of free rent, free utilities and the ability to save as they plan and make the move,” Diers said. “And, for those that may leave before the May 30, 2020, lease extension, a cash payment for the difference.”

Diers said that a couple of the businesses had given notice that they would relocate beginning in October.

“The building is going to start to go dark,” Diers added.

At its July 23 meeting, the Planning and Zoning Commission in a 7-0 vote, denied the application.

“We were a little blindsided by the decision,” Lee said. “We received some concrete guidance but we are seeking further guidance from council and that is really the point of our appeal here.”

According to a staff report, at its Sept. 19 meeting council may reverse the planning and zoning commission’s decision in whole or in part or modify the decision being appealed. Council also could attach conditions of approval on any appeal.


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