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Latest round of Snowmass Village community survey in the works

Updated community survey will be ‘more or less’ the same as 2019 version

A person walks outside Town Hall on Tuesday, May 3, 2022.
Kelsey Brunner/Snowmass Sun archives

This year’s version of the Snowmass Village community survey, for the most part, will look a lot like the previous ones, according to Assistant Town Manager Greg LeBlanc.

The proposed questions for the 2022 survey are “more or less” the same as the questions from the 2019 survey, and the town intends to use the same firm that conducted the last two iterations in 2017 and 2019, LeBlanc said during a July 11 Town Council work session. 

The overall goal is to collect similar data each time the survey goes out so the town can look at trends over the course of multiple surveys, LeBlanc said. The town usually conducts the survey every couple of years to take the pulse on community sentiments about town services and priorities. The newest iteration is slated to go out later this year.



“It’ll be interesting to see what we get back as it always is, but I think we’re a pretty good place to send that out with the comments that have been suggested,” Mayor Bill Madsen said at the meeting. 

A side-by-side comparison of the 2019 and 2022 surveys shows that people who participated last time will see some changes, including several new questions. 




The draft 2022 survey has added a question about the short-term rental of single-family homes, and whether it’s “good for the community,” “just right” or “not good for the community.” 

Councilman Tom Fridstein asked for a bit more clarity on what aspect of the rentals — having them, allowing them or the amount of them, for instance — is subject to input, so the wording of the question might be workshopped a bit. The question in the community survey is separate from the current open feedback form for people to provide input on a short-term rental permit system and possible regulations.

Another addition asks about the preservation of some town characteristics: “If you could keep one thing the same in Snowmass Village forever, what would it be?”

There also are new questions about satisfaction with town recreation programs and about what factors prevent people from using the Village Shuttle. 

Unlike the 2019 iteration, this year’s draft survey doesn’t include a question about the current amount of public art on display in the town.

Before LeBlanc sent the survey draft to council, he gathered feedback from department directors that helped inform the way the survey is set up this year, LeBlanc said. 

Some questions were “refined to reflect the current environment,” and questions were ordered to “keep like items together” in categories set up by department, he said. 

The 2022 survey has about four dozen questions, which is on par with 2019; there were a little more than three dozen questions in 2017. 

Amid an inundation of surveys everywhere, though, Councilman Tom Goode suggested erring on the side of brevity to encourage more participation. 

“I don’t think we’re going to get everybody back, because people don’t want to take the time to do a survey. … Everywhere you go, whether it’s a restaurant, or hotel, everybody wants a survey: ‘How did we do for you?” Goode said.

Survey-takers will get the chance to opt out of questions if they don’t want to answer them, LeBlanc said. They’ll also have the chance to provide open-ended feedback at the end of most sections.

kwilliams@aspentimes.com

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