I have a right to be mad as hell | AspenTimes.com

I have a right to be mad as hell

Talk about a diatribe. Michael McAllister’s letter in The Aspen Times May 24 uses the same old argument. I do not understand why anyone owning property on the S-curve alignment is allowed to bark at the moon in order to move the highway, but anyone who lives on the proposed straight shot cannot object.

At City Council meetings I’ve attended regarding this issue, anyone who made a public comment in support of the straight shot lives on the S-curves. Didn’t these homeowners on the present alignment know that the highway was there when they purchased their properties?

Didn’t they know that there was opposition to moving the highway and that it might not happen? Just like those homeowners, I knew something might be built near me; I didn’t know whether it would be trains, buses or trucks, I didn’t know when they would build it, if ever, and I didn’t know it would be 130-feet wide, or whether it would be in a tunnel.

So why does their argument carry more weight? If government forces local ranchers not to develop their land, are you going to condemn the ranchers when they object? There is a lot more to this issue than property values, or it wouldn’t have been going on for 30 years.

People directly affected by an issue are usually the ones most likely to take action. I believe anyone living on the present S-curve alignment has every right to try to move the highway, and I have every right to get mad as hell and find anyone who agrees with me to stop it.

Michael observed me in front of City Market with two ladies that don’t live anywhere near the proposed straight shot. Sixty people signed the petition that afternoon.

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The straight shot should only be built if a clear majority of Aspenites vote for it, not because a few homeowners on the S-curve alignment are louder than I am or because ballot questions have a predetermined outcome.

Cliff Weiss

Aspen