Fine to talk about fire | AspenTimes.com

Fine to talk about fire

Dear Editor:A recent letter to the editor from Mike Mason (Dec. 2) suggested that Congressman Murtha’s speech was treasonous – questioning the Bush administration’s Iraq “strategy” – because our free speech rights don’t extend to “yelling fire in a crowed theater.”I would counter that may be true, but it’s okay to discuss fire in a crowded theater, which is more to the point, I think. If the current direction and future of our country can’t be discussed in Congress, then where? Have we ever just blindly and unquestioningly followed our leaders here in the U.S.? Maybe in Germany once, but free expression won’t fit back into that bottle – let us hope!Mr. Mason gives the impression that he is one of the people I feel were purposely duped into thinking that Iraq attacked the U.S. on 9/11, and further, led to feel satisfied that it was useful and productive that we went after somebody, anybody – as long as they could be lumped into a generalized label such as Islamo-whatevers. These sound like great ideas as long as your goals include world war without end, or, if you’ve been thoroughly Limbaughtomized, I suppose. Fortunately, more and more people are now doing their own research instead of simply ingesting the official eucharist.I would urge Mike to do some research for himself and perhaps consider how many people there actually are in this rather crowded world and analyze just how effective these popular revenge slash-and-burn, feel-good, so-called solutions would actually turn out to be in the long run. Really, now, can we just go out and kill every one of ’em? Send ’em all back to Africa? (whoops, wrong era).For now, I believe Congressman Murtha has a valid awareness, apparently from experience, that supporting our troops has something to do with knowing when they’ve accomplished all that’s militarily effective, and keeping them from becoming part of the problem by overstaying that point. Why not discuss these things?Rick HillearyGlenwood Springs