Family of Tyler Ribich to present film on late Basalt teen at Buttermilk | AspenTimes.com
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Family of Tyler Ribich to present film on late Basalt teen at Buttermilk

IF YOU GO...

What: Livin’ Like Ribich movie premiere

When: Tuesday, Aug, 11, at 8:30 p.m.

Where: Buttermilk drive-in theater

How: Pre-register at http://www.eventbrite.com

Cost: Free

Tyler Ribich was a movie star in the making. And more than a year after his passing, his family is determined to make sure that Hollywood dream becomes reality, at least for one night in Aspen.

On Tuesday, Buttermilk Ski Area’s drive-in theater will host a free screening of “Livin’ Like Ribich,” a film made to commemorate Ribich and the influence he had on so many in the Roaring Fork Valley. The film, named so based off of Ribich’s Instagram account, was co-directed by his sister, Rebecca Trehy, and brother-in-law, Mike Trehy.

“It’s giving Tyler that dream of being on people’s big screens,” Mike Trehy said. “You always think your brother is the most special and the most talented and we didn’t realize that he had such a natural gift for knowing when people really needed a friend. He was always there for them to make them laugh and smile.”

Ribich died May 3, 2019, in a rollover crash on Missouri Heights. The 16-year-old was finishing up his junior year at Basalt High School and would have been part of the BHS graduating class of 2020.

One of the requirements to graduate from BHS is to complete a capstone project, and Ribich had this idea of making a film, which he was to star in. Both Rebecca and Mike Trehy had spent time in Los Angeles chasing an acting career, and much of that rubbed off on Ribich, who would come visit and take part in acting and theater camps in California.

“In the film, he was going to play a guy who wanted to be rich and famous. He was going to move to L.A. and become rich and famous, and after he became rich and famous would realize that rich and famous isn’t what it’s all about. It’s about bringing joy to people,” Mike Trehy said. “In the spirit of him wanting to make that film, we decided to make the film about Tyler. The film that he couldn’t make, that he wanted to make.”

The Trehys began interviewing people, mostly Ribich’s BHS classmates and teachers, in January, a process that took about two-and-a-half months. It was their first attempt at directing a feature film. The editing was done by Mike Critelli, a friend of theirs from L.A. who went to film school at the University of Southern California.

The original plan had been to hold a fundraiser and screening at St. Regis Aspen on May 11, which would have been Ribich’s 18th birthday, before the coronavirus pandemic brought that idea to a full stop. However, this gave them more time to fine tune the film and with the help of Aspen Skiing Co., which is offering up its Buttermilk venue, the film can finally make its big debut Tuesday.

While the screening is free, advance registration through http://www.eventbrite.com is required and attendance will be limited because of COVID-19 regulations. The movie begins at 8:30 p.m. and lasts a little more than an hour.

Mike Trehy said making the film is as much about those who knew Ribich as it was about Ribich himself. They interviewed around 50 people for the film.

“The community has given us so much love and support,” Trehy said. “We’ve never been able to tell them how much they mean to us, because it’s kind of like the film is a love note to them.”

GrassRoots TV also will air the film on Friday night and the film will be available for viewing after that at http://www.grassrootstv.org.

On top of the film, the Trehys started the Tyler Ribich Ray of Light Fund (find it on Facebook) that raises money for the arts, and they have been fundraising for Pathfinders, a local nonprofit that has helped the family through the tragedy.

acolbert@aspentimes.com


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