Eyesores-R-Us | AspenTimes.com

Eyesores-R-Us

Dear Editor:Hooray! The Maroon Creek pedestrian bridge is gone! As someone that used the Maroon Creek pedestrian bridge in excess of 100 times per year, I will sorely miss the utilitarian aspect of the Maroon Creek pedestrian bridge over these next couple of years of bridge construction.What I will not miss, however, is the impairment of the magnificent view across the golf course to Red Butte, Red Mountain and up the Hunter Creek Valley. There can be little doubt that, with the possible exception of some 1960s and 1970s condominium and Aspen Middle School architecture – a notoriously poor period in international architecture – the Maroon Creek pedestrian bridge was the most hideous and prominent structure built in Aspen since the mining era.With this structure gone, let’s turn our attention to the next eyesore at the entrance to Aspen: the golf course parking lot. For those of you who have recently visited the Glenwood Meadows Target, Glenwood Springs’ landscape standard for a parking lot is 20 percent landscaping and a landscape island including a tree every eight parking spaces.It seems remarkable that in a community as concerned with its vistas and built environment as we are that we have a park facility parking lot immediately at our entrance with a self-imposed standard that appears to be a light pole every 30 or 40 spaces. The city proved it can do better at the ARC. More completely unnatural, view-blocking landscape berms are not the answer. Let’s fix this eyesore.Mike MapleAspen