Equating history with cash flow | AspenTimes.com

Equating history with cash flow

Dear Editor:

It seems our City Council has introduced a whole new definition of ‘historical” for Ordinance 30/48. As I understand the council’s current approach, if one is unfortunate enough to have their property listed on the 30-year-old hit list, they may try to have it removed but only if they can prove financial hardship. In other words, it is not the nature of the property that is the ultimate determinate of whether the property is truly historical or not, but the financial position of the owner.

If you happen to have more money than some arbitrarily determined and subjectively applied amount, you have too much money and your property is defined as historic. If you happen to fall below that arbitrary, subjective limit then you can breath easy that your property is not historic. Thus, the City Council is amending that part of our Declaration of Independence that “all men are created equal” to mean unless you happen to have above that arbitrary amount of money.

Come on council, if a property has true historic value the financial position of the owner should have nothing to do with it. The property should be judged solely on historic grounds. But then this council would not be able to discriminate in its treatment of people based on money. And what a shame that would be.

Robert Auld

Aspen

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