Entrance arguments rebuffed | AspenTimes.com

Entrance arguments rebuffed

Dear Editor:The automatic responses to the idea of fixing the Entrance to Aspen are so generic, I can answer several letters and interviews all at once, and the points in this letter could simply be reprinted annually until the highway is expanded to four lanes.For example:1. Solving the Entrance problem won’t end traffic jams in Los Angeles.2. Cars are already idling on Main Street from the Hickory House to the Jerome, for hours at a time, so fixing the Entrance will reduce air pollution.3. It cannot be argued that fixing the Entrance will noticeably increase traffic volume unless you can identify thousands of valley residents who currently don’t drive to Aspen because the last mile and a half of highway is still two lanes.4. Mass transit subsidies have nothing to do with the current policy of preserving the traffic jam in an attempt to force individual choice of travel mode. Nobody is purposely inconvenienced at the entrance to the Maroon Creek Club in an attempt to force them to play golf on the city course, and no one is going to have their DVD player confiscated to force them to watch movies at the subsidized Isis Theatre.5. No place in the world with a population density similar to that found in the Roaring Fork Valley has ever needed a six lane highway.The Elected Officials Transportation Committee is made up of the combination of the Aspen City Council, Snowmass Village Town Council and the Pitkin County Commissioners. These are the people who decided that the written reevaluation process for the Entrance to Aspen should be closed to the public, and limited to a solution which will only benefit mass transit users, in direct defiance of the wishes of the voters whom they are supposed to serve.The heavily compromised, probably illegal and wildly undemocratic results of the written reevaluation are scheduled to be presented at an Elected Officials Transportation Committee meeting on Nov. 16, at 5 p.m., in Aspen City Hall.Anyone who cares about improving air quality, reducing the visual blight of an artificial traffic jam, restoring representative democracy, making rational use of public money, eliminating commuter stress and visitor bewilderment or applying fairness in the development of public policy might want to attend.Jeffrey EvansSouthern Basalt

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