Don’t minimize a global threat | AspenTimes.com

Don’t minimize a global threat

Dear Editor:Sue Gray (Letters to the Editor, July 27) questions my statement that present-day fascism is to be found in Islamist fundamentalism rather than the Bush administration. I respect Sue’s integrity and sincerity, but we crucially differ about where the danger lies.I do not see a parallel between Nazi Germany and the U.S. today. Germany before Hitler came to power was highly unstable and unaccustomed to democracy. American democracy is 230 years old, and the political pendulum periodically swings toward the center.Where I do see a parallel is with the failure beyond Germany’s borders to early on recognize the Nazi threat. I don’t agree with Sue that “by the time the rest of the world understood what was happening, it was too late.” It would not have been too late had Europe not been mired in appeasement and America influenced by an isolationist movement that included leftist pacifists. Only a year after Hitler became chancellor of Germany, England and France were aware that German rearmament was exceeding the allowable limits but there was not sufficient concern to put some teeth into the League of Nations.To characterize the far-flung jihadist menace as “fragmented,” and “relatively puny” is to minimize a global threat, just as the Nazi danger was once dismissed as inconsequential. Islamism may be fragmented, but the fragments share a militant fanaticism that is infecting Western European society and infiltrating the U.S., in part through its influence on American leftists. As for “puny,” Hitler needed a powerful military machine for his conquests; all Ahmadinejad will need in a few more years is a solitary true believer ready to carry a suitcase.Judith KingGlenwood Springs