Do you really need to wear eclipse glasses? | AspenTimes.com

Do you really need to wear eclipse glasses?

Yes. You’d risk blindness by staring at the sun without protection

John Ingold
The Denver Post

Many Denverites took a guarded look at the sun - or at the sun's image - in a partial, 88 percent eclipse in 1979. Denver Public School teachers took advantage of student interest in the astronomical phenomenon (there won't be another until the year 2017) to carry out some scientific classroom projects. William Wilkin, principal at Stephen Knight Elementary School, said all 380 pupils left their classrooms to see the eclipse from the vantage point of the playground. Many youngsters made viewing boxes to watch the eclipse by projection. Ernie Leyba, The Denver Post

Sure, it's only a once-in-a-generation event, but does Monday's total eclipse of the sun also have to be a total eclipse of fashion?

Picture it: There you are, dressed up for the celestial celebration, a moment of cosmic transcendence that shivers into your central nervous system and teaches you that the very same dust that makes the stars and the planets also makes you, standing wherever you are at that moment, like every single other person on Earth both in and of the universe … and what tops the wardrobe? A pair of goofy eclipse glasses. Like, do you even need to wear those stupid things?

Uh, yes.

Definitely.

Seriously, wear eclipse glasses.

Here's why: Staring into the sun, even the mostly obscured sun, can literally burn your eyeballs. Doctors say this can happen in just a few seconds. And it's possible that the damage can be permanent, causing lasting blind spots.

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