Denver airport adding 39 more gates by 2021; $1.5B project started Tuesday | AspenTimes.com
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Denver airport adding 39 more gates by 2021; $1.5B project started Tuesday

The Associated Press
The Westin Denver International Airport hotel and transit center will opened on Nov. 19, 2016. The hotel is towering glass structure with a more than 2,000-person capacity conference center and expansive 82,000-square-foot open-air plaza. (Photo by Hyoung Chang/The Denver Post)
Denver Post file photo

DENVER — Denver’s airport is expanding to keep up with a growing number of passengers and flights.

Denver International Airport broke ground Tuesday on a $1.5 billion project to add 39 more gates across its three concourses by the spring of 2021, a 35 percent increase.

Denver’s airport opened in 1995. It was built to handle up to 50 million passengers a year but 58 million people passed through last year.

In 2017, Denver also approved contracts to renovate the airport’s terminal and expand the capacity of the underground train system that passengers take to and from the concourses.

Denver is the sixth busiest airport in the United States and the 18th busiest in the world.


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