Colorado Parks and Wildlife trying to identify man who chased an angry moose in Frisco | AspenTimes.com
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Colorado Parks and Wildlife trying to identify man who chased an angry moose in Frisco

Danika Worthington
The Denver Post
A man chased an angry moose onto a median in Frisco.
Colorado Parks and Wildlife/Courtesy photo

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is asking the public to help identify a man who was photographed standing a few feet away from an angry moose in Frisco on Friday afternoon.

A passing driver saw a man chase the moose onto the median in the middle of a busy stretch of Colorado 9 south of Dillon Dam Road. The driver slowed down and his passenger snapped a photo of the man next to the agitated moose.

Summit County’s District Wildlife Manager Elissa Slezak said in a statement that the moose was clearly angry, noting pinned back ears and raised hackles. Slezak said the man could have been attacked and injured or killed.

“It is likely this person does not realize how much danger he put himself in, or maybe he does not care,” Slezak said in the statement. “We hope a conversation with this individual can help him understand the danger involved.”

Read more from The Denver Post. 


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