City of Aspen promotes two from within organization | AspenTimes.com
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City of Aspen promotes two from within organization

Courtney DeVito is new human resources director; Rob Schober is capital asset director

Courtney DeVito has been appointed as the human resources department director and Rob Schober has been promoted to capital asset director, City of Aspen officials announced Thursday.

Schober’s most recent title was asset management project manager in the capital asset department, and DeVito was serving as the interim director of human resources for the city.

Schober’s salary is $124,800 and DeVito makes $126,000 annually.



DeVito has more than 17 years of human resources experience, including nine with the city.

She started with the organization as a risk analyst in 2012 and has served as the department’s deputy director and interim director.



She formerly worked with Aspen Skiing Co. as a payroll and benefits specialist and at Arapahoe Basin Ski Area as a human resources manager.

“I’m honored to continue serving Aspen and collaborating with other city departments to incorporate our values into the work we do,” said DeVito in a news release. “I’m looking forward to building on our relationships with peers in the community to make a difference in supporting our local workforce and helping staff grow in their roles.”

DeVito received her bachelor’s degree in English literature from Saint Michael’s College in Vermont.

Additionally, she holds certifications in HR management, is a certified mediator and is currently studying for the Professional in Human Resources (PHR) exam.

She relocated to Colorado in 2002 for the ski culture as she has been entrenched in the ski community all her life.

Schober joined the city in 2018 as a project manager and previously held various general contracting roles in the private sector.

Since making the switch to public service, he has appreciated being a liaison and representing the community’s interests in city assets, according to city officials.

“I’ve never worked anywhere where you get so much public engagement,” Schober said in a prepared statement. “It’s nice to be able to make project decisions based on how a decision impacts our community and represents Aspen’s interests versus only looking at the bottom-line.”

Schober holds a bachelor’s degree in integrated science and technology from James Madison University and a master’s degree in civil engineering from Clemson University in South Carolina.

During his tenure with the city, Schober has managed several high-profile projects such as the new city offices, Burlingame Ranch phase 3 affordable housing development and the Wheeler Opera House exterior restoration.

He and his wife moved to the Roaring Fork Valley over five years ago.


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